The Philosophical Grammar: Being a View of the Present State of Experimented Physiology, Or Natural Philosophy ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Noon, 1735 - Science - 322 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page x - When God hath shower'd the earth ; so lovely seem'd That landscape : and of pure, now purer air Meets his approach, and to the heart inspires Vernal delight and joy, able to drive All sadness but despair : now gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes, and whisper whence they stole Those balmy spoils.
Page 293 - Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times ; and the turtle, and the crane, and the swallow, observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.
Page 237 - All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Page xii - The cheerfulness of heart which springs up in us from the survey of nature's works, is an admirable preparation for gratitude. The mind has gone a great way towards praise and thanksgiving, that is filled with such a secret gladness.
Page xi - But among this set of writers, there are none who more gratify and enlarge the imagination, than the authors of the new philosophy, whether we consider their theories of the earth or heavens, the discoveries they have made by glasses, or any other of their contemplations on nature. We are not a little pleased to find every green leaf swarm with millions of animals, that at their largest growth are not visible to the...
Page 313 - O AZURE vaults ! O crystal sky ! The world's transparent canopy ! Break your long silence, and let mortals know, With what contempt you look on things below.
Page x - ... months of the year with a lively verdure. In the opening of the spring, when all Nature begins to recover herself, the same animal pleasure which makes the birds sing, and the whole brute creation rejoice, rises very sensibly in the heart of man. I know none of the poets who have observed so well as Milton those secret overflowings of gladness which...
Page 161 - ... be contrary to the under current ; for the 'upper air muft move from thofe parts where the greateft heat is, and fo by a kind of circulation the NE trade wind below will be attended with a SW above...
Page ix - Delightful scenes, whether in nature, painting, or poetry, have a kindly influence on the body as well as the mind ; and not only serve to clear and brighten the imagination, but are able to disperse grief and melancholy, and to set the animal spirits in pleasing and agreeable motions.
Page xi - ... to the naked eye. There is something very engaging to the fancy, as well as to our reason, in the treatises of metals, minerals, plants, and meteors. But when we survey the whole earth at once, and the several planets that lie...

Bibliographic information