Advice to Young Men, and (incidentally) to Young Women, in the Middle and Higher Ranks of Life: In a Series of Letters, Addressed to a Youth, a Bachelor, a Lover, a Husband, a Citizen Or a Subject (Google eBook)

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J. Doyle, 1833 - Conduct of life - 268 pages
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Page 186 - Then were there brought unto him little children, that he should put his hands on them, and pray: and the disciples rebuked them. 14 But Jesus said, Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me : for of such is the kingdom of heaven.
Page 86 - ... writing, to go out at break of day, to take a walk on a hill at the foot of which our barracks lay. In about three mornings after I had first seen her, I had, by an invitation to breakfast with me, got up two young men to join me in my walk; and our road lay by the house of her father and mother. It was hardly light, but she was out on the snow, scrubbing out a washing-tub. " That's the girl for me," said I, when we had got out of her hearing.
Page 221 - I stretch myself upon the bed of sloth, and cry out for "a little more sleep, a little more slumber, a little more folding of the hands to sleep.
Page 280 - I went by the field of the slothful, and by the vineyard of the man void of understanding ; and, lo, it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down. Then I saw, and considered it well : I looked upon it, and received instruction.
Page 19 - And they shall say unto the elders of his city, This our son is stubborn and rebellious, he will not obey our voice ; he is a glutton, and a drunkard.
Page 36 - ... out of humour. When I was commander, the men had a long day of leisure before them : they could ramble into the town or into the woods ; go to get raspberries, to catch birds, to catch fish, or to pursue any other recreation, and such of them as chose, and were qualified, to work at their trades. So that here, arising solely from the early habits of one very young man, were pleasant and happy days given to hundreds.
Page 41 - I had to give, now and then, for ink, pen, or paper ! That farthing was, alas ! a great sum to me ! I was as tall as I am now ; I had great health and great exercise. The whole of the money, not expended for us at market, was twopence a week for each man. I remember, and well I may ! that...
Page 41 - I could get any evening light but that of the fire, and only my turn even of that. To buy a pen or a sheet of paper, I was compelled to forego some portion of food, though in a state of...
Page 130 - Sundays and week-days, except sleeping hours ; but I used to make time to assist her in the taking care of her baby, and in all sorts of things : get up, light her fire, boil her tea-kettle, carry her up warm water in cold weather, take the child while she dressed herself and got the breakfast ready, then breakfast, get her in water and wood for the day, then dress myself neatly and sally forth to my business.
Page 35 - I did he had never done, and never could do. Before my promotion a clerk was wanted to make out the morning report of the regiment. I rendered the clerk unnecessary ; and, long before any other man was dressed for the parade, my work for the morning was all done, and I myself was on the parade, walking, in fine weather, for an hour, perhaps.

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