The Cliftonian: A Magazine Edited by Members of Clifton College, Volume 1, Issue 1 (Google eBook)

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J. W. Arrowsmith, 1867
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Page 143 - Tarry a little ; there is something else. This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood ; The words expressly are ' a pound of flesh : ' Take then thy bond, take thou thy pound of flesh ; But, in the cutting it, if thou dost shed One drop of Christian blood, thy lands and goods Are, by the laws of Venice, confiscate Unto the state of Venice.
Page 142 - He hates our sacred nation, and he rails, Even there where merchants most do congregate, On me, my bargains, and my well-won thrift, Which he calls interest. Cursed be my tribe, If I forgive him ! Bass.
Page 325 - I am not in the least surprised nor in the least angry at this view of things. I have read the book of life for a long time, and I have read other books a little. Nothing has happened to me, but what has happened to men much better than me, and in times and in nations full as good as the age and country that we live in.
Page 325 - ... my leave of the sheriffs, the candidates, and the electors ; wishing heartily that the choice may be for the best, at a time which calls, if ever time did call, for service that is not nominal. It is no plaything you are about. I tremble when I consider the trust I have presumed to ask. I confided perhaps too much in my intentions. They were really fair and upright ; and I am bold to say, that I ask no ill thing for you, when on parting from this place I pray that whomever you choose to succeed...
Page 311 - The third day of Christmas, My true love sent to me Three French hens, Two turtle doves, and A partridge in a pear tree.
Page 142 - How like a fawning publican he looks ! I hate him for he is a Christian, But more for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice.
Page 325 - What is passed, is well stored. It is safe, and out of the power of fortune. What is to come, is in wiser hands than ours ; and He, in whose hands it is, best knows, whether it is best for you and me, that 1 should be in Parliament, or even in the world.
Page 141 - You may as well use question with the wolf Why he hath made the ewe bleat for the lamb ; You may as well forbid the mountain pines To wag their high tops, and to make no noise When they are fretted with the gusts of heaven ; You may as well do anything most hard As seek to soften that (than which what's harder ?) His Jewish heart.
Page 145 - Love thou thy land, with love far- brought From out the storied Past, and used Within the Present, but transfused Thro' future time by power of thought.

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