Tenured radicals: how politics has corrupted our higher education

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HarperPerennial, Mar 1, 1991 - Education - 222 pages
5 Reviews
Kimball takes educators and institutions to task for what he sees as their complicity in today's educational disarray and their desire to expand the canon of literature to include a wider cultural array

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Review: Tenured Radicals, Revised: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education

User Review  - Nathanael Myers - Goodreads

Hilarious stuff. Kimball rails against the "politicized" realm of humanities academe. He points fingers at Derrida, Hirsch, Stanley Fish, Lacan, Among others. He laments the turn towards ... Read full review

Review: Tenured Radicals, Revised: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education

User Review  - Mike (the Paladin) - Goodreads

Okay, up front, Some of you will hate this book, you'll disagree and without even reading it. Others like myself will look at it and say, "Yeah, I've seen this going on." Like media bias some of us ... Read full review

Contents

Speaking Against the Humanities
34
The October Syndrome
76
The Case of Paul de Man
96
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Kimball is managing editor of The New Criterion and a frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal, he has taught at Yale and Connecticut College

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