Nicomachean Ethics (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2008 - Philosophy - 240 pages
2 Reviews
The writings of Greek philosopher ARISTOTLE (384BC322Bestudent of Plato, teacher of Alexander the Greatare among the most influential on Western thought, and indeed upon Western civilization itself. From theology and logic to politics and even biology, there is no area of human knowledge that has not been touched by his thinking. In Nicomachean Ethicsconsidered a companion piece to Aristotles Politicsthe philosopher explores concepts of virtue, character, and happiness. What is the essence of being human? Do people have an ultimate function? Can desire be virtuous? What is morality? How should ethics work in the larger culture? What is justice? How should we define evil? All these questions, and others, are discussed and debated in this, one of the worlds great books. Students and armchair philosophers will find it a challengingand rewardingread.
  

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Review: Nicomachean Ethics (Ηθικά Νικομάχεια #1)

User Review  - Jared - Goodreads

Before I really go into this review, I want to note that it is a weird thing to give a classic like Aristotle's ethics a rating based on stars. Any book that has survived as long as Aristotle's Ethics ... Read full review

Good book

User Review  - jason901519 - Overstock.com

I was just browsing and decided to buy this out of curiosity, glad I did Read full review

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Contents

NICOMACHEAN ETHICS
1
BOOK II
20
BOOK III
34
BOOK IV
56
BOOK V
76
BOOK VI
98
BOOK VII
115
BOOK VIII
138
BOOK IX
159
BOOK X
179
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References to this book

Morality and the Emotions
Justin Oakley
No preview available - 1993
Morality and the Emotions
Justin Oakley
No preview available - 1993
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About the author (2008)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

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