Life of Jane Austen (Google eBook)

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Kennikat Press, 1890 - Literary Criticism - 191 pages
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Page 16 - You are now collecting your people delightfully, getting them exactly into such a spot as is the delight of my life. Three or four families in a country village is the very thing to work on...
Page 37 - I could no more write a romance than an epic poem. I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to keep it up and never relax into laughing at myself or at other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter.
Page 205 - Gazette. LIFE OF VICTOR HUGO. By Frank T. Marzials. " Mr. Marzials's volume presents to us, in a more handy form than any English or even French handbook gives, the summary of what is known about the life of the great poet."— Saturday Review.
Page 80 - My reasons for marrying are, first, that I think it a right thing for every clergyman in easy circumstances (like myself) to set the example of matrimony in his parish ; secondly, that I am convinced it will add very greatly to my happiness ; and thirdly — which perhaps...
Page 204 - Independent. LIFE OF SHELLEY. By William Sharp. " The criticisms . . . entitle this capital monograph to be ranked with the best biographies of Shelley.
Page 87 - Mr. Collins, to be sure, was neither sensible nor agreeable : his society was irksome, and his attachment to her must be imaginary. But still he would be her husband. Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object : it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and, however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want...
Page 102 - Are you, indeed? How delightful! Oh! I would not tell you what is behind the black veil for the world! Are not you wild to know?' 'Oh! yes, quite; what can it be? - But do not tell me - I would not be told upon any account. I know it must be a skeleton, I am sure it is Laurentina's skeleton. Oh! I am delighted with the book! I should like to spend my whole life in reading it. I assure you, if it had not been to meet you, I would not have come away from it for all the world.
Page 82 - Upon my word, sir,' cried Elizabeth, 'your hope is rather an extraordinary one after my declaration. I do assure you that I am not one of those young ladies (if such young ladies there are) who are so daring as to risk their happiness on the chance of being asked a second time. I am perfectly serious in my refusal. You could not make me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world who would make you so. Nay, were your friend Lady Catherine to know me, I am persuaded she would find...
Page 40 - I will only say further that my dearest sister, my tender, watchful, indefatigable nurse, has not been made ill by her exertions.
Page 140 - ABOUT thirty years ago, Miss Maria Ward, of Huntingdon, with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luck to captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park, in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raised to the rank of a baronet's lady, with all the comforts and consequences of an handsome house and large income.

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