A Man's Man (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin, 1910 - 379 pages
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Page 15 - ... Oxford and Cambridge the college crews, owing to the narrowness of the river, race not abreast but in a long string, each boat being separated from its pursuer and pursued by an equal space. Every crew which succeeds in rowing over the course without being touched (or ' 'bumped' ') by the boat behind, is said to have "kept its place," and starts in the same position for the next day's racing. But if it contrives to touch the boat in front, it is said to have made a "bump", and both bumper and...
Page 15 - For the benefit of those who have never made a study of that refinement of torture known as a "bumping" race, it may be explained that at Oxford and Cambridge the college crews, owing to the narrowness of the river, race not abreast but in a long string, each boat being separated from its pursuer and pursued by an equal space. Every crew which succeeds in rowing over the course without being touched (or "bumped") by the boat behind is said to have "kept its place," and starts in the same position...
Page 15 - Five's grandfather, but who ultimately proved to be the college tutor, in 7 min. 40 sees., it was felt that the doom of the boats in front was sealed. Then came the races. For the benefit of those who have never made a study of that refinement of torture known as a "bumping" race, it may be explained that at Oxford and Cambridge the college crews, owing to the narrowness of the river, race not abreast but in a long string, each boat being separated from its pursuer and pursued by an equal space....
Page 15 - But if it contrives to touch the boat in front, it is said to have made a "bump", and both bumper and bumped get under the bank with all speed and allow the rest of the procession to race past. Next day, bumper and bumped change places, and the victors of the day before endeavour to catch the next boat in front of them. The crew at the Head of the River of course have nothing to catch, and can accordingly devote their attention to keeping away from Number Two, which is usually in close attendance...

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