The True Republican: Containing the Inaugural Addresses, Together with the First Annual Addresses and Messages of All the Presidents of the United States, from 1789 to 1841, Together with Their Farewell Addresses, and Illustrated with the Portrait of Each of the Presidents. To which is Annexed the Declaration of Independence and Constitution of the United States ... Also, the Constitutions of the Most Important States in the Union (Google eBook)

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Richardson, 1841 - United States - 426 pages
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Page 27 - If in the opinion of the people the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation; for though this in one instance may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed.
Page 12 - ... the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained ; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 25 - Liberty itself will find in such a government, with powers properly distributed and adjusted, its surest guardian. It is, indeed, little else than a name...
Page 29 - Hence, frequent collisions, obstinate, envenomed and bloody contests. The nation, prompted by ill will and resentment, sometimes impels to war the government, contrary to the best calculations of policy. The government sometimes participates in the national propensity and adopts through passion what reason would reject ; at other times it makes the animosity of the nation subservient to projects of hostility instigated by pride, ambition, and other sinister and pernicious motives. The peace often,...
Page 30 - As avenues to foreign influence in innumerable ways, such attachments are particularly alarming to the truly enlightened and independent patriot. How many opportunities...
Page 28 - The execution of these maxims belongs to your representatives, but it is necessary that public opinion should co-operate. To facilitate to them the performance...
Page 348 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 23 - Sensible of this momentous truth, you have improved upon your first essay by the adoption of a constitution of government better calculated than your former for an intimate union, and for the efficacious management of your common concerns. This government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and...
Page 349 - ... best which is capable of producing the greatest degree of happiness and safety, and is most effectually secured against the danger of maladministration; and that...
Page 420 - That the printing presses shall be free to every person who undertakes to examine the proceedings of the legislature or any branch of government : and no law shall ever be made to restrain the right thereof. The free communication of thoughts .and opinions is one of the invaluable rights of man ; and every citizen may freely speak, write and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty.

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