The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literature

Front Cover
Berthold Schoene-Harwood
Edinburgh University Press, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 424 pages
0 Reviews
The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literatureexamines the ways in which the cultural and political role of Scottish writing has changed since the country’s successful referendum on national self-rule in 1997. In doing so, it makes a convincing case for a distinctive post-devolution Scottish criticism.Introducing over forty original essays under four main headings - ‘Contexts’, ‘Genres’, ‘Authors’ and ‘Topics’ - the volume covers the entire spectrum of current interests and topical concerns in the field of Scottish studies and heralds a new era in Scottish writing, literary criticism and cultural theory. It records and critically outlines prominent literary trends and developments, the specific political circumstances and aesthetic agendas that propel them, as well as literature’s capacity for envisioning new and alternative futures. Issues under discussion include class, sexuality and gender, nationhood and globalisation, the New Europe and cosmopolitan citizenship, postcoloniality, as well as questions of multiculturalism, ethnicity and race. Written by critics from around the world - and by several creative writers - the work of solidly established Scottish authors is discussed alongside that of relative newcomers who have entered the scene over the past ten years or currently emergent writers who are still in the process of getting noticed as part of a new literary avant-garde.Key Features* Defines a new period in Scottish literary history: ‘post-devolution Scottish literature’* Introduces over forty original essays under four main headings - 'Contexts', 'Genres', 'Authors' and 'Topics'* Positions literature within the broadest possible cultural framework, from history, politics and economics to new creative technologies, ecology and the media* Likely to become the ‘standard’ work of criticism appealing to students, teachers, researchers and critics as well as to a general readership interested in Scottish literary affairs
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction Postdevolution Scottish Writing
1
Part I Contexts
5
Reconstituting Scottishness in Postdevolution Criticism
7
Literature and Cultural Politics in Postdevolution Scotland
17
Days of Rage and Fire
28
Scottish Literature in the Media
34
Devolution as Iteration
43
Chapter 6 Is that a Scot or am Ah Wrang?
51
Christopher Whyte and Cosmopolitanism
194
Utopia Nationalism and the Posthuman
202
Janice Galloway and Gender Disorientation
210
Race and Citizenship in the Work of Jackie Kay
219
Parochialism Pornography and Globalisation
227
Kathleen Jamie and Ecology
236
Chapter 28 Don Paterson and Poetic Autonomy
245
Chapter 29 Alan Warner Postfeminism and the Emasculated Nation
255

Part II Genres
57
The Glasgow Novel in the Twentyfirst Century
59
Imagining the Possible
68
Chapter 9 Twentyone Collections for the
78
Scottish Gaelic Literature after Devolution
88
Douglas Galbraith James Robertson and the New Historical Novel
97
Chapter 12 Scottish Television Drama and Parochial Representation
106
Domesticity and Domicile in Contemporary Scottish Womens Poetry
114
Architecture Townplanning and Unhomeliness
124
Crime Fiction and the Scottish State
132
Hybridity in Contemporary Childrens Fiction
141
Chapter 17 Gaelic Prose Fiction in English
149
Part III Authors
157
Edwin Morgan and Liz Lochhead
159
Chapter 19 Alasdair Gray and Postmillennial Writing
167
Chapter 20 James Kelman and the Deterritorialisation of Power
175
Andrew Greig and Modernism
184
Chapter 30 A L Kennedys Dysphoric Fictions
264
Masculinity Race and Nation in Postdevolution Scotland
275
Postdevolution Scottish Lesbian and Gay Writing
283
Devolution and Postcoloniality
292
Identity and Language in the PostTrainspotting Novel
301
Scotland Northern Ireland and the Return of the Postmodern
310
Devolutionary Comedy and Scottish Camp
319
Contemporary Scottish Literature and the Supernatural
328
Scottish Literary Translation in the Twentyfirst Century
336
The International Reception of Scottish Literature
345
Representing Scotland in American Romance Novels
354
Public Funding of Film in Scotland
362
Context Performance Renaissance
371
Notes on Contributors
380
Bibliography
385
Index
417
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)


Berthold Schoene is Professor of English and Director of the English Research Institute at the Manchester Metropolitan University

Bibliographic information