Dwight's American Magazine, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Theodore Dwight
1846
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Page 116 - As for me, I will behold thy face in righteousness: I shall be satisfied, when I awake, with thy likeness.
Page 448 - But wild beasts of the desert shall lie there; and their houses shall be full of doleful creatures; and owls shall dwell there, and satyrs shall dance there.
Page 163 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Page 117 - I should like to be buried there ; and let me beg of you, as you value your old friend, not to suffer any pomp to be used at my funeral ; nor any monument, nor monumental inscription whatsoever, to mark where I am laid : but lay me quietly in the earth, place a sun-dial over my grave, and let me be forgotten.
Page 207 - Is this a. fast to keep The larder lean, And clean From fat of veals and sheep ? Is it to quit the dish Of flesh, yet still To fill The platter high with fish...
Page 510 - By day its voice is low and light ; But in the silent dead of night, Distinct as a passing footstep's fall, It echoes along the vacant hall. Along the ceiling, along the floor, And seems to say, at each chamber-door— " Forever — never ! Never — forever ! " Through days of sorrow and of mirth.
Page 345 - Lonely, I no longer roam, Like the cloud, the wind, the wave ; Where you dwell, shall be my home, Where you die, shall be my grave...
Page 593 - And Abraham gat up early in the morning to the place where he stood before the LORD : and he looked toward Sodom and Gomorrah, and toward all the land of the plain, and beheld, and, lo, the smoke of the country went up as the smoke of a furnace.
Page 216 - And every shepherd tells his tale Under the hawthorn in the dale. Straight mine eye hath caught new pleasures, Whilst the landscape round it measures ; Russet lawns, and fallows gray, Where the nibbling flocks do stray ; Mountains, on whose barren breast The labouring clouds do often rest ; Meadows trim, with daisies pied ; Shallow brooks, and rivers wide ; Towers and battlements it sees Bosomed high in tufted trees, Where perhaps some beauty lies, The cynosure of neighbouring eyes.
Page 354 - Thy servant kept his father's sheep, and there came a lion and a bear, and took a lamb out of the flock. And I went out after him and smote him, and delivered it out of his mouth; and when he arose against me, I caught him by his beard and smote him and slew him.

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