The Idea of Justice

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, Sep 30, 2009 - Philosophy - 467 pages
11 Reviews
Social justice: an ideal, forever beyond our grasp; or one of many practical possibilities? More than a matter of intellectual discourse, the idea of justice plays a real role in how - and how well - people live. And in this book the distinguished scholar Amartya Sen offers a powerful critique of the theory of social justice that, in its grip on social and political thinking, has long left practical realities far behind.
  

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Review: The Idea Of Justice

User Review  - Ajgoebertus - Goodreads

I read this book over a long period of time. It is certainly not riveting or easy to read. The genius of Amartya Sen is clear in this summation of what is justice. Despite my limited knowledge and ... Read full review

Review: The Idea Of Justice

User Review  - CJ - Goodreads

One of the most thought-provoking books I read. I will probably need to re-read it few times to understand it fully. However, I was impressed with its general message that while the ideal justice ... Read full review

Contents

An Approach to Justice
1
The Demands of Justice
29
Reason and Objectivity
31
Rawls and Beyond
52
Institutions and Persons
75
Voice and Social Choice
87
Impartiality and Objectivity
114
Closed and Open Impartiality
124
Lives Freedoms and Capabilities
225
Capabilities and Resources
253
Happiness Wellbeing and Capabilities
269
Equality and Liberty
291
Public Reasoning and Democracy
319
Democracy as Public Reason
321
The Practice of Democracy
338
Human Rights and Global Imperatives
355

Forms of Reasoning
153
Position Relevance and Illusion
155
Rationality and Other People
174
Plurality of Impartial Reasons
194
Realizations Consequences and Agency
208
The Materials of Justice
223
Justice and the World
388
Notes
417
Name Index
451
Subject Index
462
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

 Amartya Kumar Sen is an Indian economist who was awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to welfare economics and social choice theory, and for his interest in the problems of society’s poorest members.

Sen was best known for his work on the causes of famine, which led to the development of practical solutions for preventing or limiting the effects of real or perceived shortages of food. He is currently the Thomas W. Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is also a senior fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, where he previously served as Master from the years 1998 to 2004. He is the first Asian and the first Indian academic to head an Oxbridge college.

Amartya Sen's books have been translated into more than thirty languages. He is a trustee of Economists for Peace and Security. In 2006, Time magazine listed him under "60 years of Asian Heroes" and in 2010 included him in their "100 most influential persons in the world"

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