A History of the University in Europe: Volume 3, Universities in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries (18001945) (Google eBook)

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Walter Regg
Cambridge University Press, Sep 16, 2004 - History
1 Review
This is the third volume of a four-part series which covers the development of the university in Europe (east and west) from its origins to the present day, focusing on a number of major themes viewed from a European perspective. The originality of the series lies in its comparative, interdisciplinary, collaborative and trans-national nature. It deals also with the content of what was taught at the universities, but its main purpose is an appreciation of the role and structures of the universities as seen against a backdrop of changing conditions, ideas and values. This 2004 volume deals with the modernisation, differentiation and expansion of higher education which led to the triumph of modern science, changing the relations between universities and national states, teachers and students, their ambitions and political activities. Special attention is focused on the fundamental advances in 'learning' - the content of what was taught at the universities.
  

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This book is the third volume of the series on European Universities. Being no-European myself, I found it a treasure to know about the history of European universities for my research on European Higher Education policies. The sketches by various writers helps the reader to not only know the history but also analyse the various events. Written in lucid language and analytical and non-evaluative way, it makes a good resource. 

Contents

THEMES
3
PATTERNS
33
European universities
70
RELATIONS WITH
83
RESOURCES
101
TEACHERS
123
THE DIFFUSION
163
ADMISSION
233
HISTORY AND
459
THE MATHEMATICAL
493
BIOLOGY AND
519
MEDICINE
543
TECHNOLOGY
593
UNIVERSITIES AND WAR
637
EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES AND SIMILAR
673
WALTER RU
702

STUDENT MOVEMENTS
269
GRADUATION AND CAREERS
363
THEOLOGY AND THE ARTS
393

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Popular passages

Page 4 - There are no more Frenchmen, Germans, Spaniards, even Englishmen, nowadays, regardless of what people may say; there are only Europeans. All have the same tastes, the same passions, the same morals, because none has been given a national form by a distinctive institution. All will do the same things under the same circumstances...
Page xviii - Konrad H. Jarausch, Students, Society and Politics in Imperial Germany: The Rise of Academic Illiberalism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982), 350.

About the author (2004)

Walter Regg is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Berne, Switzerland.

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