The Modern Preacher and the Ancient Text: Interpreting and Preaching Biblical Literature (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1988 - Religion - 374 pages
10 Reviews
A fusion of biblical hermeneutics and homiletics, this thorough and well-researched book offers a holistic contemporary approach to the interpretation and preaching of biblical texts, using all the scholarly tools available and focusing especially on literary features. Greidanus develops hermeneutical and homiletical principles and then applies them to four specific genres: Hebrew narratives, prophetic literature, the Gospels, and the Epistles.
  

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outstanding !

User Review  - david - Christianbook.com

though this work is a little bit technical, it is a must read for anyone wanting to understand several things about biblical literature: its nature, its overall meaning then in its own time and now ... Read full review

Review: Modern Preacher and the Ancient Text

User Review  - Ben - Christianbook.com

The comments by the previous reviewer indicates he doesn't "get it." Since the Bible is the Word of God, preachers must proclaim what it means and proclaim it's significance for today. Therefore, the ... Read full review

Contents

HEBREW HISTORY WRITING
189
History Writing
191
Historical and Nonhistorical Narratives
192
The Importance of Historicity
193
Functions of Historical Referents
194
Preaching Texts Not Bare Facts
196
LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS OF HEBREW NARRATIVE
197
The Scene
199

Classification of Biblical Forms
20
HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS
24
THE HISTORICALCRITICAL METHOD
25
Appraisal
29
A HOLISTIC HISTORICALCRITICAL METHOD
36
Correlation in an Open Universe
37
Analogy and Unique Events
41
The Principle of Criticism
42
LITERACY INTERPRETATION
48
Dimensions of a Holistic Alternative
49
METHODS OF LITERARY INTERPRETATION
51
Form Criticism
52
Redaction Criticism
55
Rhetorical Criticism
58
Biblical Theology
67
The Canonical Approach
73
HOLISTIC LITERARY INTERPRETATION
77
Interrelationship of Literary Methods
78
Ahistorical Tendencies
79
HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION
80
Objective Point of Control
81
BIBLICAL HISTORY WRITING
82
Historical Events
83
History Writing
86
Historical Reliability
91
THE HISTORY OF GODS KINGDOM
94
Creation to New Creation
95
The Biblical View of History
96
CreationFallRedemption
98
Kingdom History and Interpretation
100
THEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION
102
Reasons for Theological Interpretation
104
THE PURPOSE OF THE AUTHOR
106
Gods Ultimate Purpose
110
THE BIBLES THEOCENTRIC PURPOSE
113
Theocentric Interpretation
114
Christocentric Preaching
118
THE PURPOSE OF PREACHERS TODAY
120
TEXTUALTHEMATIC PREACHING
122
TEXTUAL PREACHING
123
The Selection of a PreachingText
124
The Purpose of Text and Sermon
128
TEXTUALTHEMATIC PREACHING
131
The Theme of the Sermon
136
THE FORM OF THE SERMON
141
Development within Forms
142
THE DIDACTIC FORM
144
A Model of the Didactic Form
145
Advantages of the Didactic Form
146
THE NARRATIVE FORM
148
Advantages of the Narrative Form
151
Pitfalls of the Narrative Form
152
TEXTUAL FORMS
154
The Sermon Outline
155
THE RELEVANCE OF THE SERMON
157
THE HISTORICALCULTURAL GAP
158
Improper Ways of Bridging the Gap
159
CONSIDERATIONS FOR PROPERLY BRIDGING THE GAP
166
Recognize the Discontinuity
167
Recognize the Overarching Continuity
169
Focus on the Goal of the Text
173
The Question of Identifying with Bible Characters
175
RELEVANT PROCLAMATION TODAY
181
The Sermon as Relevant Communication
182
Congregational Involvement
184
PREACHING HEBREW NARRATIVES
188
Characterization
200
Dialogue
201
Plot
203
The Narrator
206
Rhetorical Structures
208
HOLISTIC INTERPRETATION
213
Historical Interpretation
214
Theological Interpretation
216
GUIDELINES FOR PREACHING HEBREW NARRATIVES
221
Holistic Interpretation
222
Theme Formulation
223
The Form of the Sermon
224
The Relevance of the Sermon
226
PREACHING PROPHETIC LITERATURE
228
THE ESSENCE OF BIBLICAL PROPHECY
229
A Message about the Future
231
A Message about the Corning Kingdom
235
LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS OF PROPHETIC LITERATURE
238
The Structure of Prophetic Books
239
Forms in Prophetic Literature
240
Rhetorical Structures
244
GUIDELINES FOR PREACHING PROPHETIC LITERATURE
250
Literary Interpretation
252
Historical Interpretation
255
Theological Interpretation
256
Theme Formulation
259
The Form of the Sermon
260
The Relevance of the Sermon
261
PREACHING THE GOSPELS
263
THE GENRE OF GOSPEL
264
Characterizations of the Gospel Genre
265
Characteristics of the Gospel Genre
266
NEW TESTAMENT HISTORY WRITING
269
Reliability of New Testament Narratives
273
LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GOSPELS
277
The Structure of the Gospels
278
Narrative Features
285
Rhetorical Structures
290
Other Literary Devices
293
GUIDELINES FOR PREACHING THE GOSPELS
295
Text Selection
296
Literary Interpretation
297
Historical Interpretation
299
Theological Interpretation
305
Theme Formulation
306
The Form of the Sermon
307
The Relevance of the Sermon
308
PREACHING EPISTLES
311
THE GENRE OF EPISTLE
312
Treatises or Sermons
313
Pastoral and Tractate Letters
314
LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EPISTLES
315
Rhetorical Structures
319
Other Literary Devices
321
GUIDELINES FOR PREACHING THE EPISTLES
323
Literary Interpretation
325
Historical Interpretation
327
Theological Interpretation
331
Theme Formulation
333
The Form of the Sermon
334
The Relevance of the Sermon
336
Select Bibliography
342
Subject Index
365
Scripture Index
371
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 1 - For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it.
Page 3 - But how are men to call upon him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without a preacher?
Page 2 - By the word of the LORD the heavens were made, and all their host by the breath of his mouth.
Page 3 - In many and various ways God spoke of old to our fathers by the prophets; but in these last days he has spoken to us by a Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world.

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About the author (1988)

Sidney Greidanus is professor emeritus of preaching at Calvin Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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