Salmon Fishing: With a Frontispiece by Joseph Farquharson, a Facsimile in Colours of a Model Set of Flies for Scotland, Ireland, England and Wales, Illustrations of Angling Scenes Characteristic of These Parts of the United Kingdom, and Pictures of Salmon Passes (Google eBook)

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Adam and C. Black, 1906 - Salmon-fishing - 314 pages
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Page 248 - Eden), and all other waters (wherein salmons be taken), shall be in defence for taking salmons, from the Nativity of our Lady unto St. Martin's day; and...
Page 147 - ... shores of Sutherlandshire, Eossshire, and Inverness-shire for more than one hundred miles, at distances varying from five to twenty miles from the western sea. In winter and spring, these mountains are snow-clad, and every partial melting of their snows brings down torrents of ice-cold water, which run through the short channels of these rivers into the sea. But the water of that sea, unlike that of the German Ocean that washes our eastern shores, is warmed by the soft influence of the Gulf Stream,...
Page 249 - During the last few years of the eighteenth century and the first quarter of the nineteenth there is a decided though gradual change in names of the dramatists whose works were presented.
Page 146 - The Scottish rivers flowing into the German Ocean are almost all early rivers. They have comparatively long courses, and fall into the sea at considerable distances from their mountain sources, after running during some part of their career through districts not greatly elevated, and possessing a moderate climate. But the German Ocean, into which these...
Page 44 - ... evening with one of these insects. The humorous side of the controversy is appreciated by Mr Earl Hodgson, who, whilst giving Sir Herbert Maxwell's views at least sufficient attention, exhibits the weak points in his armour and those in Dr Barton's in an amusing way. He arrives at the conclusion that ' the more closely we examine the scientific doctrine as set forth by the authorities, the more suspicious becomes its resemblance to those other opinions of that peculiar class, the intellectually...
Page 69 - ... recognition of the fact that confidence plays a great part in success. If neither angler nor gillie believes in the tackle, the chances are poor indeed. Yet every now and then salmon show a distinct preference for one fly over another; apropos of which Mr Earl Hodgson tells the following story : ' Two men, one of whom was Mr Watson Lyall, who told me the happenings, were fishing on a river from the same boat. By lunch-time one rod had caught seven salmon, and Mr Lyall had caught none. All...

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