The bookbinder's manual [by G. Cowie]. (Google eBook)

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1832
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Page 90 - ... which must be put into a trough, or some broad vessel; then with a stick curl them, or draw them out in streaks, to as much variety as may be done. Having done this, hold your book, or books, close together, and only dip the edges in, on the top of the water and colours, very lightly ; which done, take them off, and...
Page v - It is now wholly disused, except in oriental countries, and in Jewish Synagogues, where they still continue to write books of the law on slips of vellum sewed together, so as to form only one long page, with a roller at each extremity, furnished with clasps of gold or silver.
Page 93 - Raife the .plate, by lifting up one end; and it will be found veined, in every direction, by the...
Page v - ... ascertain ; but Phillatius, a learned Athenian, was the first who pointed out the use of a particular kind of glue for fastening the leaves of a book together; an invention which his countrymen thought of such importance as to entitle him to a statue. The most ancient mode of binding consisted in gluing the different leaves together and attaching them to cylinders of wood, round which they were rolled. This is called Egyptian, binding ; and continued to be practised long after the age of Augustus.
Page 67 - ... stout board, as before described, care being taken in this instance to form a deep narrow, rather than a round band. Strong pieces of canvass or buckram are then glued at the top and bottom of the back, and between each of the vellum slips. A hollow back is prepared by taking a slip of milled board, about a quarter of an inch wider than the back of the book, and soaking it in water ; it is then glued on both sides, and left in this state for about ten minutes : having been laid on a sheet of...
Page v - At what time the art of BOOK-BINDING was first invented it is impossible to ascertain ; but Phillatius, a learned Athenian, was the first who pointed out the use of a particular kind of glue for fastening the leaves of a book together; an invention which his countrymen thought of such importance as to entitle him to a statue. The most ancient mode of binding consisted in gluing the different leaves together and attaching them to cylinders of wood, round which they were rolled.
Page 74 - ... book of gold leaf, rub them well together until they are very fine, add half a pint of clear water, and mix them well together : when the water clears, pour it off, and put in more, till the honey is all extracted, and nothing remains but the gold. Mix one grain of corrosive sublimate...
Page 85 - Brazil wash, and glair it. Put the book between wands, allowing the boards to slope a little. Dash on copperas water, then with a sponge full of red liquid, press out on the back and on different parts large drops, which will run down each board, and make a fine shaded red.
Page 93 - ... sheet of paper; on the coloured size thus spread lay a strong plate of glass, or one of tin, or copper, or a thin piece of board, pressing the plate (of whatever sort) gently with the hand on every part, raise the plate by lifting up one end, and it...
Page 87 - ... a day or two, frequently breaking the lumps, and stirring it till the whole appear dissolved and equally mixed with the water. The consistence of the solution should be nearly that of strong gum water used in minialure painting; and, if it appear thicker, water must be added ; or, if thinner, more of the gum.

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