MEN OF MARK 'TWIXT TYNE AND TWEED (Google eBook)

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Page 317 - QC A New, Revised, and considerably Enlarged Edition (the 6th), with very numerous Illustrations. 4s. 6d. cloth limp; 5s. 6d. cloth boards, gilt. 82. THE POWER OF WATER, as applied to drive Flour Mills, and to give motion to Turbines and other Hydrostatic Engines.
Page 132 - THE LORD hear thee in the day of trouble; the name of the God of Jacob defend thee; 2 Send thee help from the sanctuary, and strengthen thee out of Zion; 3 Remember all thy offerings, and accept thy burnt sacrifice; Selah.
Page 124 - Dunscotus was a very learned man, who lived about the end of the thirteenth and the beginning of the fourteenth century. The English and Scots strive which of them shall have the honour of his birth.
Page 87 - ... God the searcher of all hearts, take thee CD, for my wedded Wife ; and do also in the presence of God, and before these witnesses, promise to be unto thee a loving and faithful Husband.
Page 373 - Who, when he came, and had seen the grace of God, was glad, and exhorted them all, that with purpose of heart they would cleave unto the Lord. For he was a good man, and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith : and much people was added unto the Lord.
Page 82 - The patronizing air of his people nettled him caused him to reflect somewhat bitterly that "a prophet is not without honour save in his own country.
Page 631 - Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD ; As I live, surely mine oath that he hath despised, and my covenant that he hath broken, even it will I recompense upon his own head.
Page 175 - An English-Saxon homily on the birthday of St. Gregory; anciently used in the English-Saxon church. Giving an account of the conversion of the English from paganism to Christianity. Translated into modern English, with notes, by Eliz. Elstob. London, Printed by W. Bowyer, 1709.
Page 300 - Placed by circumstances, the one on the south and the other on the north side of the...
Page 198 - Whereupon Colonel Fenwick played upon him" a little "with the great guns." But the Governor still would not yield; nay sent a Letter couched in these singular terms: "I, William of the Wastle, Am now in my Castle; And aw the dogs in the town Shanna gar 3 me gang down.

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