Dialogics of Self, the Mahabharata, and Culture: The History of Understanding and Understanding of History

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Anthem Press, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 316 pages
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'Dialogics of Self, the Mahabharata and Culture: The History of Understanding and Understanding of History' explores the interrelationships between individual and cultural historical dynamics in interpreting texts, using key concepts from Bakhtin's theory of dialogics. This ambitious volume discusses the limits of fixed monologic discourses and the benefits of fluid dialogic discourses, and provides a cultural and psychological analysis of the epic Indian text the 'Mahabharata'. The problem addressed by 'Dialogics of Self, the Mahabharata and Culture' is not just how we understand and narrate history, but also how the very mechanism by which we understand and narrate history itself has a history. This volume is about the interplay of several histories - that of the individual, individual's past relationship to the text, which in turn is dependent on the nature of encounters they have had in the past, and the history of the text, and the very history of understanding.

  

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Contents

Introduction So Whats the Story and Why This Story?
3
About Self
37
Telling Tales About Lives
39
Who Tells What Kinds of Stories?
91
About Memory
103
The Cultural Scene Allure of Tales in the Living Texts
105
Remembering Mahabharata The Story Telling Time and the Time of the Story
121
Gendered Memories The Heroines Journey in Time
141
The Reading Act
157
Readers Plots and Discourse
225
About Self Memory and Interpretation
235
Tales in Lives and Lives in Tales
237
Reflections on Real Time in Great Time
251
Tables
265
Interview Documents
271
References
297

About Interpretation
155

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About the author (2010)

Lakshmi Bandlamudi is Professor of Psychology at LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York. Her research and teaching interests are focused on the area of human development, with a special emphasis on dialogic consciousness. She is also the author of a travelogue.

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