Life of Joseph Brant--Thayendanegea: including the border wars of the American Revolution and sketches of the Indian campaigns of generals Harmar, St. Clair, and Wayne. And other matters connected with the Indian relations of the United States and Great Britain, from the peace of 1783 to the Indian peace of 1795, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Scholarly Press, Incorporated, 1838 - Biography & Autobiography
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Page 393 - We have beaten the enemy twice, under separate commanders. We cannot expect the same good fortune always to attend us. The Americans are now led by a chief who never sleeps: the night and the day are alike to him. And during all the time that he has been marching upon our villages, notwithstanding the watchfulness of our young men, we have never been able to surprise him. Think well of it. There is something whispers me, it would be prudent to listen to his offers of peace.
Page 374 - I find no appearance of a line remains ; and from the manner in which the people of the United States rush on, and act, and talk, on this side; and from what I learn of their conduct toward the sea, I shall not be surprised if we are at war with them in the course of the present year ; and if so, a line must then be drawn by the warriors.
Page 462 - And portance in my travel's history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Page 360 - ... and, we are persuaded, they would most readily accept of it, in lieu of the lands you sold them. If you add, also, the great sums you must expend in raising and paying armies, with a view to force us to yield you our country, you will certainly have more than sufficient for the purposes of re-paying these settlers for all their labor and their improvements.
Page 372 - That it shall be lawful to stop and detain all vessels loaded wholly or in part with corn, flour or meal, bound to any port in France, or any port occupied by the armies of France...
Page 220 - John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and Henry Laurens on the part of the United States, and Mr. Fitzherbert and Mr.
Page 360 - You have talked to us about concessions. It appears strange that you should expect any from us, who have only been defending our just rights against your invasions. We want peace. Restore to us our country, and we shall be enemies no longer.
Page 108 - As soon as they were left alone Mrs. Arnold became tranquillized, and assured Mrs. Prevost that she was heartily sick of the theatrics she was exhibiting. She stated that she had corresponded with the British commander that she was disgusted with the American cause and those who had the management of public affairs and that, through great persuasion and unceasing perseverance, she had ultimately brought the general into an arrangement to surrender West Point to the British.
Page 271 - ... necessary that any cession of our lands should be made in the most public manner, and by the united voice of the confederacy, holding all partial treaties as void and of no effect.
Page 359 - To the Commissioners of the United States. Brothers: We have received your speech, dated the 31st of last month, and it has been interpreted to all the different nations. We have been long in sending you an, answer, because of the great importance of the subject. But, we now answer it fully; having given it all the consideration in our power.

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