The Portable Machiavelli (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jan 25, 1979 - Literary Collections - 576 pages
7 Reviews
In the four and a half centuries since Machiavelliís death, no single and unanimously accepted interpretation of his ideas has succeeded in imposing itself upon the lively debate over the meaning of his works. Yet there has never been any doubt about the fundamental importance of Machiavelliís contribution to Western political theory.The Portable Machiavelli brings together the complete texts of The Prince, Belfagor, and Castruccio Castracani, newly translated by Peter Bondanella and Mark Musa especially for this volume. In addition, the editors include an abridged version of The Discourses; a play, The Mandrake Root, in its entirety; seven private letters; and selections from The Art of War and The History of Florence.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ljrei77 - LibraryThing

Fantastic books that not only contains the works of Machiavelli but has exceptional commentary on them. The thing i like most about this book is that it contains The Mandrake Root; the comedic play ... Read full review

Review: The Portable Machiavelli

User Review  - Gabriel Valjan - Goodreads

The year 2013 marks both the celebration of Italian culture in America and the five-hundred-year anniversary of NiccolÚ Machiavelli's The Prince. Written in 1513, but not published in its entirety ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER XXIII ON HOW TO AVOID FLATTERERS
CHAPTER XXIV WHY ITALIAN PRINCES HAVE LOST THEIR STATES
CHAPTER XXV ON FORTUNES ROLE IN HUMAN AFFAIRS AND HOW SHE CAN BE DEALT WITH
CHAPTER XXVI AN EXHORTATION TO LIBERATE ITALY FROM THE BARBARIANS
BOOK I
BOOK II
CHAPTER V HOW THE CHANGES IN RELIGIOUS SECTS AND LANGUAGES TOGETHER WITH THE OCCURRENCE OF FLOODS AND PL...
CHAPTER VII HOW MUCH LAND THE ROMANS GAVE TO THEIR COLONISTS

MACHIAVELLI TODAY
I TRANSLATIONS
II ITALIAN EDITIONS
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
CHAPTER I HOW MANY KINDS OF PRINCIPALITIES THERE ARE AND THE WAY THEY ARE ACQUIRED
CHAPTER III ON MIXED PRINCIPALITIES
CHAPTER IV WHY THE KINGDOM OF DARIUS OCCUPIED BY ALEXANDER DID NOT REBEL AGAINST HIS SUCCESSORSAFTER THE D...
CHAPTER V HOW CITIES OR PRINCIPALITIES SHOULD BE GOVERNED THAT LIVED BY THEIR OWN LAWS BEFORE THEY WERE OCC...
CHAPTER VI ON NEW PRINCIPALITIES ACQUIRED BY ONES OWN ARMS AND BY SKILL
CHAPTER VII ON NEW PRINCIPALITIES ACQUIRED WITH THE ARMS AND FORTUNES OF OTHERS
CHAPTER VIII ON THOSE WHO HAVE BECOME PRINCES THROUGH WICKEDNESS
CHAPTER IX ON THE CIVIL PRINCIPALITY
CHAPTER X HOW THE STRENGTH OF ALL PRINCIPALITIES SHOULD BE MEASURED
CHAPTER XI ON ECCLESIASTICAL PRINCIPALITIES
CHAPTER XII ON THE VARIOUS KINDS OF TROOPS ANDMERCENARY SOLDIERS
CHAPTER XIII ON AUXILIARY MIXED AND CITIZENSOLDIERS
CHAPTER XIV A PRINCES DUTY CONCERNING MILITARY MATTERS
CHAPTER XV ON THOSE THINGS FOR WHICH MEN AND PARTICULARLY PRINCES ARE PRAISED OR BLAMED
CHAPTER XVI ON GENEROSITY AND MISERLINESS
CHAPTER XVII ON CRUELTY AND MERCY AND WHETHER IT IS BETTER TO BE LOVED THAN TO BE FEARED OR THE CONTRARY
CHAPTER XVIII HOW A PRINCE SHOULD KEEP HIS WORD
CHAPTER XIX ON AVOIDING BEING DESPISED AND HATED
CHAPTER XX ON WHETHER FORTRESSES AND MANY THINGS THAT PRINCES EMPLOY EVERY DAY ARE USEFUL OR HARMFUL
CHAPTER XXI HOW A PRINCE SHOULD ACT TO ACQUIRE ESTEEM
CHAPTER XXII ON THE PRINCES PRIVATE ADVISERS
CHAPTER X WEALTH DOES NOT REPRESENT THE SINEWS OF WAR AS POPULAR OPINION WOULD HAVE IT
CHAPTER XI IT IS NOT A WISE POLICY TO FORM A FRIENDSHIP WITH A RULER WHO HAS MORE PRESTIGE THAN STRENGTH
CHAPTER XIII ONE RISES FROM A LOW TO A HIGH STATION MORE OFTEN BY USING FRAUD INSTEAD OF FORCE
CHAPTER XIV MEN OFTEN DECEIVE THEMSELVES THINKING THEY WILL CONQUER PRIDE WITH HUMILITY
CHAPTER XVI HOW FAR SOLDIERS OF OUR TIMES HAVE TURNED FROM ANCIENT DISCIPLINE
CHAPTER XIX CONQUESTS MADE BY REPUBLICS WHICH ARE NOT WELL ORGANIZED AND WHICH DO NOT PROCEED ACCORDING ...
CHAPTER XX WHAT SORT OF DANGER A PRINCE OR A REPUBLIC EMPLOYING AUXILIARY OR MERCENARY TROOPS INCURS
CHAPTER XXI THE FIRST PRAETOR THE ROMANS SENT ANYWHERE WAS SENT TO CAPUA AND THIS OCCURRED AFTER FOUR HUN...
CHAPTER XXII HOW OFTEN THE OPINIONS OF MEN ARE WRONG IN JUDGING IMPORTANT MATTERS
CHAPTER XXIV FORTRESSES ARE GENERALLY MUCH MORE HARMFUL THAN USEFUL
CHAPTER XXV THAT AN ASSAULT UPON A CITY DIVIDED BY INTERNAL STRIFE IN ORDER TO OCCUPY IT AS A RESULT OF THIS ST...
CHAPTER XXVIII HOW DANGEROUS IT IS FOR A REPUBLIC OR A PRINCE NOT TO AVENGE A PUBLIC OR PRIVATE INJURY
CHAPTER XXX TRULY POWERFUL REPUBLICS AND PRINCES DO NOT BUY FRIENDSHIPS WITH MONEY BUT RATHER WITH THEIR A...
CHAPTER XXXI HOW DANGEROUS IT IS TO BELIEVE EXILES
CHAPTER XXXII ON THE MEANS EMPLOYED BY THE ROMANS IN TAKING CITIES
THE PLAYERS
ACT I
ACT II
ACT III
ACT IV
ACT V
BOOK I
BOOK II
BOOK VII
Written by Niccolb Machiavelli and Sent to His Very Dear Friends Zanobi Buondelmonti and Luigi Alamanni
PREFACE
BOOK III
BOOK V
BOOK VII COSIMO DE MEDICI
BOOK VIII
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

NiccolÚ Machiavelli (1469-1527) was a Florentine statesman who was later forced out of public life. He then devoted himself to studying and writing political philosophy, history, fiction, and drama.


Mark Musa and Peter Bondanella are professors at the Center for Italian Studies at Indiana University. Mark Musa, a former Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellow, is the author of a highly acclaimed translation of Danteís Divine Comedy. Peter Bondanella, a former Younger Humanist and Senior Fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has published, among other works, Machiavelli and the Art of Renaissance History and Federico Fellini: Essays in Criticism. He is coeditor of The Dictionary of Italian Literature and The Portable Machiavelli.


Mark Musa and Peter Bondanella are professors at the Center for Italian Studies at Indiana University. Mark Musa, a former Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellow, is the author of a highly acclaimed translation of Danteís Divine Comedy. Peter Bondanella, a former Younger Humanist and Senior Fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, has published, among other works, Machiavelli and the Art of Renaissance History and Federico Fellini: Essays in Criticism. He is coeditor of The Dictionary of Italian Literature and The Portable Machiavelli.


Mark Musa is a professor at the Center for Italian Studies at Indiana University. A former Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellow, Musa is the author of a highly acclaimed translation of Dante's Divine Comedy.
Mark Musa is a professor at the Center for Italian Studies at Indiana University. A former Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellow, Musa is the author of a highly acclaimed translation of Dante's Divine Comedy.

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