In Defense of Natural Law

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Oxford University Press, 2001 - Business & Economics - 343 pages
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In `Making Men Moral', Robert George questioned the central doctrines of liberal jurisprudence and political theory. In his new work he extends his critique of liberalism, and also goes beyond it to show how contemporary natural law theory provides a superior way of thinking about basic problems of justice and political morality. It is written with the same combination of stylistic elegance and analytical rigour that distinguished his critical work. Not content merely to defend natural law from its 'cultural despisers'; he deftly turns the tables and deploys the idea to mount a stunning attack on regnant liberal beliefs about such issues as abortion, sexuality, and the place of religion in public life. Students as well as scholars in law, political science, and philosophy will find George's arguments stimulating, challenging, and compelling.

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About the author (2001)

Robert George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University. He is an former Presidential Appointee to the United States Commission on Human Rights, and has served as a Judicial Fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States

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