Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages

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U of Nebraska Press, 1966 - Foreign Language Study - 221 pages
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"Combined here are two classics on the nature of native languages of North America: Boas' famous 1911 essay pointing to new methods of research and Powell's pioneering 1891 work on classification."--Scholarly Books in America "Two cognate essays--the first by the world famous anthropologist Franz Boas, expounding his phonetic and grammatical principles in evaluating Indian languages, and the second by the first director of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of Ethnology, John Wesley Powell, which classifies the various 'Amerindian' groups on the basis of language--though issued years ago as Bulletins of the Bureau of Ethnology--are still regarded as fundamental to all subsequent work on the subject."--The World in Books "Both works . . . are of immediate and continuing value, not only to students of linguistics but to all Americanists and anthropologists in general. . . . it must be stressed that all . . . later work stems directly out of the pioneering papers here presented."--Preston Holder, in his preface.
  

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Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages and Indian Linguistic Families of America North of Mexico . University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, pp. ...
ccat.sas.upenn.edu/ ~haroldfs/ bibliogs/ lgpolbib/ LCLPBibliography.html

About the author (1966)

Franz Boas, a German-born American anthropologist, became the most influential anthropologist of his time. He left Germany because of its antiliberal and anti-Semitic climate. As a Columbia University professor for 37 years (1899-1936), he created both the field of anthropology and the modern concept of culture. Boas played a key role in organizing the American Anthropological Association (AAA) as an umbrella organization for the emerging field. At both Columbia and the AAA, Boas encouraged the "four field" concept of anthropology; he personally contributed to physical anthropology, linguistics, archaeology, as well as cultural anthropology. His work in these fields was pioneering. Both directly and through the influence of such students as Ruth Benedict, Melville J. Herskovits, Alfred L. Kroeber, and Margaret Mead, he set the agenda for all subsequent American cultural anthropology. In His lifetime Boas had many leadership roles including: Assistant curator at the American Museum of Natural History; editor of The Journal of American Folklore; president of the New York Academy of Sciences, and founder of the International Journal of American Linguistics. Boas is the author of hundreds of scientific monographs and articles. He died in 1942.

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