Gout and Its Cure (Google eBook)

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Boericke & Tafel, 1895 - Gout - 176 pages
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Page 47 - I cannot go on with his medicine; it sets all my pulses beating, makes me terribly giddy, makes me feel as if I were going to topple (forwards) in my bed, and then a bad headache comes on, and when I take it at night it makes me very feverish, so I am leaving it off.
Page 42 - ... my mind for years, but one day being in difficulty about a case of ague, I treated it with a tincture of nettles and cured it straight away, and my next case also, and my next, and almost every case ever since, and with very nearly uniform success. Some of my cases of ague cured with nettle-tincture were most severe ones, invalided home from India and Burmah. And quite lately a patient living in Siam, to whom I had sent a big bottle of nettle-tincture, wrote me: " The tincture you sent us...
Page 90 - A country squire, from the shire of Moonrakers, bachelor, 60 years of age, was accompanied to me on October 3, 1893, by his brother, resident in London. This gentleman was so very ill that his case was regarded as quite hopeless. He was not capable of stating his own case, and hence his brother did it for him. Patient was flushed, and in much pain over the eyes and in both rib regions. Stooping caused very great pain, worse in the left hypochondrium. Both liver and spleen notably enlarged. He is...
Page 90 - His breath was in the highest degree disgustingly stercoraceous (nierdeux), so much so that I very nearly vomited when examining him. He was personally unknown to me, and I had no history of him, but that smell of breath is an unmistakable sign of the chronic tippler. I subsequently ascertained that he was quite a sober-living man, but took frequent nips, particularly when confined to the house by wet weather.
Page 82 - Heart's action irregular ; liver and spleen both elarged ; and he complained bitterly of a gnawing in the pit of the stomach. His gait was unsteady and tottering, his hands quivered, and altogether he was in a sorry plight. The poor fellow had lost his wife, and had for a good while tried to rub along with the aid of a little Dutch courage, in the shape of nips of spirits, for which he was always craving. Severe windy spasms ; no sugar, no albumen.
Page 42 - Homage to the charwoman of nettle-tea fame ! The thing escaped my mind for years, but one day being in difficulty about a case of ague, I treated it with a tincture of nettles and cured it straight away, and my next case also, and my next, and almost every case ever since, and with very nearly uniform success. Some of my cases of ague cured with nettle-tincture were most severe ones, invalided home from India and Burmah. And quite lately a patient living in Siam, to whom I had sent a big bottle of...
Page 47 - ... Urt. ur. was his sheet-anchor in cases of the fevers of the East India, Burma, and Siam. This action of Urtica, as well as its antigout action, I have had abundant opportunity of verifying. Urtica causes fever as well as cures it, and one of Burnett's patients was obliged to stop taking it : " It sets all my pulses beating, makes me terribly giddy, makes me feel as if I was going to topple (forwards) on my head, and then a bad headache comes on ; and when I take it at night, it makes me very...
Page 34 - I observed others who, being under the influence of Urtica urens, passed grit and gravel pretty freely for the first time in their lives, I came to the conclusion that the Urtica possesses the power of eliminating the urates from the economy.
Page 41 - I did not take your medicine at all, for when I got home I had such a severe attack of fever that my charwoman begged me to allow her to make me some nettle- tea, as that was a sure cure of fever. I consented, and she at once went into our garden, where...
Page 41 - One day my patient came tripping somewhat jauntily into my consulting room and informed me that she was quite cured of her fever, and wished to consult me in regard to another matter. I at once turned to my notes of her case, and inquired more closely, into the matter of the cure, in order to duly credit my prescribed remedy with the cure, and the more so as ague is not always easily disposed of therapeutically. 'Oh.

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