The history of Wales (Google eBook)

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1788 - 40 pages
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Page 154 - He shall have a harp from the King, and a gold ring from the Queen, when his office is secured to him. The harp he shall never part with.
Page 33 - We know not which way to turn us. The Barbarians drive us to sea, and the sea forces us back to the Barbarians ; between which we have only the choice of two deaths, either to be swallowed up by the waves, or butchered by the sword.
Page 569 - Ruthlan, where they did their work : who attempted by force to take away his wife from him, and while he defended her as well as he could, one of them killed the wife, and he who killed her, with his fellows, was taken: and when the kindred of her which was slain, required law at the justice of Chester's hands (for their kinswoman), they were put in prison, and the murderers were delivered.
Page 98 - V. them, but even to facrifice their lives : and agreeably to this fpirit, they entertained an idea, that it was a difgrace to die in their beds, but an honour to fall in the field. Such was their eager courage, that although unarmed...
Page 501 - (I vom1 champion with the dead < His heart which late, with martial fire, Bade his lov'd country's foes expire . Such fire, as wastes the forest hill, Now like the winter's ice is chill. O'er the pale...
Page 546 - years, and having built twelve monafteries ; after having been exem" plary in the piety of thofe days, this holy perfon died, at a moft ad" vanced period of human life} having attained, as it is faid, to the age " of one hundred and forty-fix years. He was buried in the Cathedral " Church of St. David ; and many years after canonized by Pope Califtus " the Second."— Werringtan's fftfary cf Woks, vol.
Page 487 - By the order of the parliament he was arraigned before certain judges, who condemned him "to be drawn to the gallows as a traitor to the king, who had made him a knight; to be hanged as the murderer of the gentlemen taken in the castle of Hawarden ; to have his bowels burnt, because he had profaned by assassination the solemnity of Christ's Passion ; and to have his quarters dispersed through the country, because he had in different places compassed the death of his lord the king.
Page 100 - ... only. The offer of water for the purpofe of wafhing the feet, was confidered as an invitation to accept of hofpitable entertainment. The young men ufually marched in parties, or in tribes, a leader being appointed to each ; and as they were devoted to arms, or given up to leifure, and were courageous in the defence of their country, they were permitted to enter the houfe of any perfon with the fame fecurity as their own. The ftrangers, who arrived in the morning, were entertained until evening...
Page 505 - The audience usually call for the tune : sometimes only a few can sing to it ; and in many cases the whole company : but when a party of capital singers assemble, they rarely call for a tune, for it is indifferent to them what tune the harper plays. Parishes often contend against parishes, and every hill is vocal with the chorus.
Page 101 - The fire was kept burning at their feet throughout the night, as well as in the day. THE women of this nation, as well as the men, had their hair cut round at the ears and eyes.

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