The Magazine of the beau monde; or, Monthly journal of fashion [afterw.] The Nouveau beau monde; or Magazine of fashion (Google eBook)

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Page 25 - ... renounce the devil and all his works, and constantly believe God's holy word, and obediently keep his Commandments. I demand therefore, DOST thou, in the Name of this child, renounce the devil and all his works, the vain pomp and glory of the world, with all covetous desires of the same, and the carnal desires of the flesh, so that thou wilt not follow, nor be led by them?
Page 32 - If he does not call Werther delicious, My own Araminta, say 'No!' If he ever sets foot in the City Among the stockbrokers and Jews, If he has not a heart full of pity, If he don't stand six feet in his shoes, If his lips are not redder than roses, If his hands are not whiter than snow, If he has not the model of noses, My own Araminta, say 'No!
Page 15 - I knew not whether from the good cause or the bad; darkness and lights; tempest and human faces; and at last, with the sense that all was lost, female forms, and the features that were worth all the world to me, and but a moment allowed and clasped hands, and heartbreaking partings, and then everlasting farewells!
Page 17 - THERE is a calm for those who weep, A rest for weary pilgrims found, They softly lie and sweetly sleep Low in the ground. The storm that wrecks the winter sky No more disturbs their deep repose, Than summer evening's latest sigh That shuts the rose.
Page 32 - He must walk - like a god of old story Come down from the home of his rest; He must smile like the sun in his glory On the buds he loves ever the best; And oh ! from its ivory portal Like music his soft speech must flow! If he speak, smile, or walk like a mortal, My own Araminta, say 'No!
Page 15 - I knew not whether from the good cause or the bad : darkness and lights : tempest and human faces : and at last, with the sense that all was lost, female forms, and the features that were worth all the world to me, and but a moment allowed, and clasped hands...
Page 61 - ... scandal; at society, and was blown about by its slightest veerings of opinion ; at literary fame, and left fair copies of his private letters, with copious notes, to be published after his decease ; at rank, and never for a moment forgot that he was an Honourable ; at the practice of entail, and tasked the ingenuity of conveyancers to tie up his villa in the strictest settlement.
Page 31 - You tell me you're promised a lover, My own Araminta, next week; Why cannot my fancy discover The hue of his coat and his cheek? Alas! if he look like another, A vicar, a banker, a beau, Be deaf to your father and mother, My own Araminta, say 'No!
Page 31 - Has hurried me off to the Po, Forget not Medora Trevilian: My own Araminta, say "No!" We parted! but sympathy's fetters Reach far over valley and hill; I muse o'er your exquisite letters, And feel that your heart is mine still; And he who would share it with me, love, The richest of treasures below, If he's not what Orlando should be, love, My own Araminta, say "No!
Page 15 - Anthem, and which, like that, gave the feeling of a vast march, of infinite cavalcades filing off, and the tread of innumerable armies. The morning was come of a mighty day a day of crisis and of final hope for human nature, then suffering some mysterious eclipse, and labouring in some dread extremity.

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