History of Cass County Indiana: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time : with Biographical Sketches and Reference to Biographies Previously Compiled, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Jehu Z. Powell
Lewis Publishing Company, 1913 - Cass County (Ind.)
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Contents

I
1
II
9
IV
12
V
20
VI
23
VII
27
VIII
42
IX
57
XXIX
329
XXX
334
XXXI
341
XXXII
347
XXXIII
361
XXXIV
369
XXXV
377
XXXVI
384

X
75
XI
81
XII
89
XIII
98
XIV
125
XV
191
XVI
207
XVII
211
XVIII
218
XIX
222
XX
227
XXI
251
XXII
255
XXIII
262
XXIV
273
XXV
290
XXVI
295
XXVII
309
XXVIII
322
XXXVII
387
XXXVIII
393
XXXIX
403
XL
420
XLI
443
XLII
456
XLIII
477
XLIV
499
XLV
518
XLVI
537
XLVII
554
XLVIII
572
XLIX
592
L
616
LI
635
LII
658
LIII
676
LIV
701

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Page 37 - Doubtless it will be painful to leave the graves of their fathers; but what do they more than our ancestors did or than our children are now doing? To better their condition in an unknown land our forefathers left all that was dear in earthly objects. Our children by thousands yearly leave the land of their birth to seek new homes in distant regions.
Page 37 - Can it be cruel in this Government, when, by events which it can not control, the Indian is made discontented in his ancient home, to purchase his lands, to give him a new and extensive territory, to pay the expense of his removal, and support him a year in his new abode? How many thousands of our own people would gladly embrace the opportunity of removing to the West on such conditions?
Page 407 - In the night-time or the day-time he would rally brave and well, Though the summer lark was fifing or the frozen lances fell, Knowing if he won the battle they would praise their Maker's name, Knowing if he lost the battle then the doctor was to blame.
Page 136 - Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, in virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution and the laws, have thought fit to call forth...
Page 45 - Hoosier met him at the door — Their salutations soon were o'er. He took the stranger's horse aside, And to a sturdy sapling tied ; Then, having stripped the saddle off, He fed him in a sugar-trough.
Page 45 - Invited shortly to partake Of venison, milk, and johnny-cake, The stranger made a hearty meal, And glances round the room would steal. One side was lined with divers garments, The other spread with skins of "varmints"; Dried pumpkins overhead were strung, Where venison hams in plenty hung; Two rifles placed above the door; Three dogs lay stretched upon the floor— In short, the domicile was rife With specimens of Hoosier life. The host, who center'd his affections On game, and range, and quarter...
Page 233 - Where wild flowers bloom in the valley deep; Where the sweet robes of spring may softly rest, In purity, over the sleeper's breast: Where is heard the voice of the sinless dove, Breathing notes of deep and undying love ; Where no column proud in the sun may glow, To mock the heart that is resting below ; Where pure hearts...
Page 45 - ... and spoons. White heads, bare feet and dirty faces, Seemed much inclined to keep their places, But Madam, anxious to display Her rough and undisputed sway, Her offspring to the ladder led And cuffed the youngsters up to bed.
Page 45 - With snake-pole and a yoke of oxen : Others with pack-horse, dog and rifle, Make emigration quite a trifle. The emigrant is soon located — In Hoosier life initiated — Erects a cabin in the woods, Wherein he stows his household goods. At first, round logs and clapboard roof, With puncheon floor, quite carpet-proof, And paper windows, oiled and neat. His edifice is then complete, When four clay balls, in form of plummet, Adorn his wooden chimney's summit; Ensconced in this, let those who can Find...
Page 124 - ... party announced Eel river in front, and the town on the opposite bank. I dismounted, ran forward, and examined the situation of the town as far as was practicable, without exposing myself; but the whole face of the country, from the "Wabash to the margin of Eel river, being a continued thicket of brambles, black jacks, weeds and shrubs of different kinds, it was impossible for me to get a satisfactory view, without endangering a discovery.

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