The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere: For Satb Divisi Choir and Wind Symphony

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Lorenz Educational Publ, Sep 1, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 92 pages
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As an accomplished conductor, pianist, and brass player, Ren Clausen is uniquely qualified to write a piece for choir and wind symphony while avoiding the inherent pitfalls in such a work. The instruments never cover the singers, the singers do not have to over-sing to be heard, and the resulting overall effect is an exciting and stunning work that will inspire the performers and thrill the audience. Using the famous Longfellow poem, "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere," Dr. Clausens five movements invoke the excitement of the horse ride as well as the quiet of the streets, the beauty of the night, the history of the rickety old bell tower, and the breathless excitement as the message is delivered. (The first movement, "One if by Land, Two if by Sea," is available separately. SATB score 15/2601R; Instrumental score and parts 30/2462R)

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About the author (2009)

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was born in 1807 in Portland, Maine, and he became a professor of modern languages at Harvard. His most famous narrative poems include The Song of Hiawatha, Paul Reveres Ride, "The Village Blacksmith," "The Wreck of the Hesperus." From his friend Nathaniel Hawthorne, Longfellow got a brief outline of a story from which he composed one of his most favorite poems, 'Evangeline'. The original story had Evangeline wandering about New England in search of her bridegroom. One of the first poets to take the landscape and stories of North America as his subjects, Longfellow became immensely popular all over the world, and he was the first American commemorated in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey. He was given honorary degrees at the great universities of Oxford and Cambridge, invited to Windsor by Queen Victoria, and called by request upon the Prince of Wales. He was also chosen a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and of the Spanish Academy. He died on March 24, 1882.

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