Creating a Climate for Change: Communicating Climate Change and Facilitating Social Change (Google eBook)

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Susanne C. Moser, Lisa Dilling
Cambridge University Press, Feb 1, 2007 - Science
1 Review
The need for effective communication, public outreach and education to increase support for policy, collective action and behaviour change is ever present, and is perhaps most pressing in the context of anthropogenic climate change. This book is the first to take a comprehensive look at communication and social change specifically targeted to climate change. It is a unique collection of ideas examining the challenges associated with communicating climate change in order to facilitate societal response. It offers well-founded, practical suggestions on how to communicate climate change and how to approach related social change more effectively. The contributors of this book come from a diverse range of backgrounds, from government and academia to non-governmental and civic sectors of society. The book is accessibly written, and any specialized terminology is explained. It will be of great interest to academic researchers and professionals in climate change, environmental policy, science communication, psychology, sociology and geography.
  

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An interesting interdisciplinary take on motivating a response to climate change. Although it mostly falls into the area of persuasion rather than real structural change which is what is really needed for to create a climate for change it does offer an interesting view of the diverse ways in which climate change is perceived. 

Contents

1
31
2
44
3
64
4
81
5
89
6
105
7
119
8
139
17
266
Introduction
281
19
292
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Table 211 cont
327
22
339
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359

9
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10
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11
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13
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16
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Household consumption styles
261
Note
264
MSRs goal is the installation of one million solar energy
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About the author (2007)

Susanne Moser is a Research Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Institute for the Study of Society and Environment, Boulder, Colorado. She is an Aldo Leopold Leadership Program fellow and an associate of the International Human Dimensions Program (IHDP) Core Project on Global Environmental Change and Human Security (GECHS).

Lisa Dilling is a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado at Boulder. She has been awarded a Visiting Fellowship by CIRES, a John A. Knauss National Sea Grant Fellowship, and a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship.

Bibliographic information