Alfred Or A Narrative of the Daring and Illegal Measures to Suppress a Pamphlet Intituled, Strictures on the Declaration of Horne Tooke, Esq. Respecting "Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales," Commonly Called Mrs. Fitzherbert: With Interesting Remarks on a Regency; Proving, on Principles of Law and Common Sense, that a Certain Illustrious Personage is Not Eligible to the Important Trust. ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
and sold at No.9, Queen-Street, Grosvenor-Square., 1789 - Freedom of the press - 48 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 18 - But He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; The chastisement of our peace was upon Him, And by His stripes we are healed.
Page 31 - It provides nothing againlt the indifcreet marriage x>fa prince of the blood, being regent at the age of twenty-one, nor furnifhes any remedy againft his permitting fuch marriages to others of the blood-royal, the regal power fully veiling in him as to this purpofe, and without the affiftance...
Page 30 - Bccaufe the liberty of marriage is a natural right inherent in mankind. Becaufe this right is confirmed and enforced by the holy fcriptures, which declare marriage to be of divine inftitution, and deny to none the benefit of that inftitution.
Page 29 - ... planted in us by the Author of our nature, and utterly incompatible with all religion, natural and revealed, and therefore a mere act of power, having neither the nature nor obligation of law.
Page 31 - Britain. It provides no remedy, at any age, against the improvident marriage of the King reigning, the marriage, of all others, the most •
Page 30 - ... in any country, a party attached to a pretender to the crown, whofe claim he may affert, has been fet afide by no other authority than that of an aft, to which the legiflature was not competent, as being contrary to the common rights of mankind.
Page 43 - ... more than was. granted in an equal number of years, between 1751 and 1759, for the ufe of the navy, although we had been four years at war with France within that period. 2dly. Becaufe the navy of England appears to be reduced from what it was in the year 1771, when the prefent firft Lord of the Admiralty fucceeded to the head of that board, notwithftanding the immenfe fums granted for its fupport and increafe fince that time.
Page 4 - ... merit. In every country, even in England, we find that foreigners should be careful of what they do, as well as of what they write, if they wish their packets a safe arrival to their destination : they should take care that nothing offensive to the government be inserted ; for frequently, as in England, truth is a libel, and the greater the truth, the greater the libel. Whether Mr. Holman has already learnt this useful, and, to travellers, necessary lesson, time will develope ; if so, he may...
Page 28 - I was transported with indignation, because, from a situation the most honorable in the kingdom, it reduced you to a state of infamy and contempt. It proclaimed, in the face of day, and to the astonishment of the world, that a woman of birth, beauty, and independence was the strumpet of the Prince of Wales, and under this head I have no scale to measure your demerits. A poor disconsolate female whom a villain has seduced, or the want of bread has driven to prostitution, is an angel of innocence in...
Page 31 - ... marriage, of all others, the moft important to .the public. It provides nothing againft the indifcreet marriage of a prince of the blood, being regent at the age of twenty-one, nor...

Bibliographic information