The trade signs of Essex: a popular account of the origin and meanings of the public house & other signs now or formerly found in the county of Essex (Google eBook)

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E. Durrant, 1887 - Travel - 184 pages
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Page 21 - I have here said should affect it. I must however observe to you upon this subject, that it is usual for a young tradesman, at his first setting up, to add to his own sign that of the master whom he served, as the husband after marriage gives a place to his mistress's arms in his own coat.
Page 112 - The Maypole — by which term from henceforth is meant the house, and not its sign — the Maypole was an old building, with more gable ends than a lazy man would care to count on a sunny day; huge zig-zag chimneys, out of which it seemed as though even smoke could not choose but come in more than naturally fantastic shapes, imparted to it in its tortuous progress ; and vast stables, gloomy, ruinous, and empty.
Page 33 - Five maidens' heads appear upon the arms of the town of Reading, and the crest of Thornhill shows the same figure. The arms of the Mercers' Livery Company [" Gules, a demi- virgin couped below the shoulders, issuing from clouds all proper, vested or, crowned with an Eastern crown of the last, her . hair dishevelled, and wreathed round the temples with roses of the second, all within an orle of clouds proper...
Page 165 - Crown," however, may be regarded as still older ; for, as Mr. Larbord tells us in his " History of Signboards," "we read of it as early as 1467, when a certain Walter or Walters, who kept the ' Crown,' in Cheapside, made an innocent Cockney pun, saying that he would make his son heir to the ' Crown ' — a jest which so displeased King Edward IV. that he ordered the man to be put to death for high treason.
Page 126 - Of all the cursed roads that ever disgraced this kingdom in the very ages of barbarism, none ever equalled that from Billericay to the King's Head at Tilbury.
Page 112 - The place was said to have been built in the days of King Henry the Eighth; and there was a legend, not only that Queen Elizabeth had slept there one night while upon a hunting excursion, to wit, in a certain oak-panelled room with a deep bay window, but that next morning, while standing on a mounting-block before the door with one foot in the stirrup, the Virgin Monarch had then and there boxed and cuffed an unlucky page for some, neglect of duty.
Page 73 - The wretched, bloody, and usurping boar, That spoiled your summer fields, and fruitful vines, Swills your warm blood like wash, and makes his trough In your embowelled bosoms, this foul swine Lies now even in the centre of this isle, Near to the town of Leicester, as we learn.
Page 71 - The late Earl of Oxford, father to him that now liveth, hath been noted within these forty years to have ridden into this city, and so to his house by London stone, with eighty gentlemen in a livery of Reading tawny, and chains of gold about their necks, before him, and one hundred tall yeomen, in the like livery, to follow him without chains, but all having his cognisance of the blue boar embroidered on their left shoulder.
Page 112 - ... pointed out that there it stood in the same place to that very day, the doubters never failed to be put down by a large majority, and all true believers exulted as in a victory. Whether these, and many other stories of the like nature, were true or untrue, the Maypole was really an old house, a very old house, perhaps as old as it claimed to be, and perhaps older, which will SOL»*times happen with houses of an uncertain, as with ladies of a certain, age.
Page 112 - Maypole was an old building, with more; gable ends than a lazy man would care to count on a sunn^ day ; huge zig-zag chimneys, out of which it seemed as though even smoke could not choose but come in more than naturally fantastic shapes, imparted to it in its tortuous progress ; and vast stables, gloomy, ruinous, and empty. The place was...

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