An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting;: With Proper Rules for the Exercise of that Pleasant Art ... (Google eBook)

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A. Millar, 1753 - Conduct of life - 234 pages
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Page 84 - Although I would have you early instill into your children's hearts the love of cruelty, yet by no means call it by its true name, but encourage them in it under the name of fun.
Page 38 - ... between working for very low wages, or becoming largely superfluous dependents on someone else. The second alternative was the only one as far as those of gentle birth were concerned; for, as Jane Collier, dependent of Fielding and friend of Richardson, wrote: 'There are many methods for young men . . . to acquire a genteel maintenance; but for a girl I know not one way of support that does not by the esteem of the world, throw her below the rank of gentlewoman'.1 A few unmarried women, it is...
Page 124 - ... a disposition, as to take delight in reading to you any of our best and most entertaining authors. If, for instance, he desires you to hear one of Shakespeare's plays, you may give him perpetual interruptions, by sometimes going out of the room, sometimes ringing the bell to give orders for what cannot be wanted till the next day; at other times taking notice (if your children are in the room), that Molly's cap is awry, or that Jackey looks pale; and then begin questioning the child, whether...
Page 125 - Jack ey looks pale; and then begin questioning the child, whether he has .done any thing to make himself sick. If you have needle-work in your hands, you may be so busy in cutting out, and measuring one part with another, that it will plainly appear to your husband, that you mind not one word he reads. If all this teazes him enough to make him call on you for your attention, you may say, that indeed you have other things to mind besides poetry ; and if he was uneasy at your taking care of your family...
Page 229 - ... that are your constant and true tormentors. I know that many learned and good men have taken great pains to undermine this our noble art, by laying down rules, and giving exemplars, in order to teach mankind to give no offence to any one, and, instead of being a torment, to be as great a help and comfort to their friends, as it is in their power to be. But with infinite pleasure do I perceive, either that they are not much read, or, at least, that they have not the power of rooting from the human...
Page 230 - ... them as mere amusements ; you have my leave to peruse them. Or rather, if you will only remember to observe my orders, in acting in direct opposition to all that a Swift, an Addison, a Richardson, a Fielding, or any other good ethical writer intended to teach, you may (by referring sometimes to these my rules, as helps to your memory) become as profound adepts in this art, as .uiy of the readers of Mr.
Page 58 - I plainly see your talents will bring you forward here, and let me give you one piece of advice, which is, to be very moderate and...
Page 123 - ... the needle; neglect your family as much as ever his temper will bear; and always have white gloves on your hands. Tell him, that every woman of spirit ought to hate and despise a man who could insist on his wife's being a family drudge; and declare, that you will not submit to be a cook and semstress to any man. But if he loves company, and chearful parties of pleasure, and would willingly have you always with him, insult him with your great love of needle-work and housewifery. Jane was the daughter...
Page 229 - ... are not much read, or, at least, that they have not the power of rooting from the human breast that growing sprig. of mischief there implanted with our birth ; and generally, as we come to years of discretion, flourishing like a green palm-tree: yet, to shew my great candour and generosity to these my mortal (or rather moral) foes, I will endeavour, as far as my poor recommendation will go, to forward the sale of their books, even among my own pupils. For if, my good scholars, you will guard...
Page 38 - ... young women who have been well educated ; and who, by the misfortune or death of their friends, have been left destitute of all means of subsistence.

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