William Gilmore Simms, the Novelist, the Poet (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Barbee & Smith, 1896 - 73 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 170 - Library Society, which was organized in 1824, united with the older association. The prospects of this united society are now very bright ; the volumes number nearly twenty thousand, and the annual income from various sources is over two thousand dollars.1 WORK OF THE DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS. But while the State and private persons were establishing schools and promoting the cause of education, the various charitable and religious societies were not idle. They not only labored in the centres, but...
Page 170 - but as to classical learning, history (civil and ecclesiastical), mathematics, astronomy, chemistry, botany, and natural history, excepting here and there a rare instance of a man who is eminent in some one of these branches, we may be said to have no learning at all, or a mere smattering.
Page 151 - Simms' novels, I had long desired to see the author. He now came forward with a slow, stately step, under the full blaze of the chandeliers, a man in the prime of life, tall, vigorous, and symmetrically formed.
Page 221 - Yes, a virile and upright spirit, constitutionally incapable of fraud or meanness, and chastened, at last, into pathetic gentleness ; a man greater than his works, produced, as they had been, under circumstances of peculiar trial, but of which, nevertheless, it may be predicted.
Page 162 - In the West, There is a simpler and a hardier nature, That proves men's values, not by wealth and title, But mind and manhood. There, no ancient stocks, Claim power from precedence. Patrician people, That boast of virtues in their grandmothers, Are challenged for their own. With them it answers, If each man founds his family, and stands The father of a race of future men ! Mere parchment, and the vain parade of title, Lift no man into stature. Such a region Yields all that I demand an open field,...
Page 151 - His head was a noble one, with a conspicuously high forehead, finely developed in the regions of ideality, and set upon broad shoulders in haughty, leonine grace. Under strangely mobile eyebrows flashed a pair of bluish-gray eyes, keen and bright as steel. His mouth, slightly prominent, especially in the upper lip, was a wonderfully firm...
Page 171 - David's, was organized i' purposely for founding a public school in said parish for educating youth in the Latin and Greek languages, mathematics, and other useful branches of learning." In these various ways schools were founded over the entire colony, and the work was not checked even by the Revolutionary War. At the close of the war, there were twenty-two grammar schools in the province.3 In many of these, if not in all, instruction was given in Latin, Greek, and mathematics. But away out on the...
Page 169 - ... prominent part in conversation, but Fisher Ames was the favorite of every intelligent company; and when Gouverneur Morris, another brilliant talker, visited Boston, Ames was pitted against him. The intellectual wants of the community grew with the growing prosperity; but the names of half-a-dozen persons could hardly be mentioned whose memories survived by intellectual work made public in Massachusetts between 1783 and 1800.
Page 171 - ... thousand dollars.1 WORK OF THE DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS. But while the State and private persons were establishing schools and promoting the cause of education, the various charitable and religious societies were not idle. They not only labored in the centres, but carried their work to the farthest outposts. The Presbyterians in the upper part of the State and the Church of England in the lower part placed the means of education within reach of all...
Page 192 - I had never heartily embraced the profession had never studied con amove and, after two years wasted in the dreary life of a political editor, I was not in training for the resumption of the severe and systematic methods which the law demands of its votaries. Literature was my only refuge, as it had been my first love, and, as I fancied, my proper vocation; and...

Bibliographic information