The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the human mind ... To which is prefixed introduction and part first of the Outlines of moral philosophy. 1854 (Google eBook)

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T. Constable and Company, 1854
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Page 102 - That gravity should be innate, inherent and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it.
Page 271 - I behold like a Spanish great galleon, and an English man-of-war ; Master Jonson (like the former) was built far higher in learning ; solid, but slow in his performances. Shakespeare with the English man-ofwar, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Page 453 - As I darkened the little light he had, he lifted up a hopeless eye towards the door, then cast it down, shook his head, and went on with his work of affliction.
Page 276 - And when I die, be sure you let me know Great Homer dy'd three thousand years ago. Why did I write? what sin to me unknown Dipt me in Ink, my parents, or my own? As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame, I lisp'd in numbers, for the numbers came. I left no calling for this idle trade, No duty broke, no father disobey'd. The Muse but serv'd to ease some friend, not Wife, To help me thro...
Page 60 - I call therefore a complete and generous education that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices both private and public of peace and war.
Page 486 - ... universality belongs not to things themselves, which are all of them particular in their existence; even those words and ideas, which in their signification are general.
Page 158 - Let custom from the very childhood have joined figure and shape to the idea of God, and what absurdities will that mind be liable to about the Deity...
Page 432 - Nor, creeping through the woods, the gelid race Of berries. Oft in humble station dwells Unboastful worth, above fastidious pomp. Witness, thou best Anana, thou the pride Of vegetable life, beyond whate'er The poets imaged in the golden age...
Page 277 - All that we feel of it begins and ends In the small circle of our foes or friends; To all beside as much an empty shade...
Page 146 - O, who can hold a fire in his hand, By thinking on the frosty Caucasus...

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