The cabinet, a series of essays [by A. Bell]. (Google eBook)

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Page 329 - Here thou, great ANNA ! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take and sometimes tea.
Page 327 - Where angels tremble while they gaze, He saw; but, blasted with excess of light, Closed his eyes in endless night.
Page 259 - Who taught the nations of the field and wood To shun their poison, and to choose their food ? Prescient, the tides or tempests to withstand, Build on the wave, or arch beneath the sand?
Page 406 - Go, from the creatures thy instructions take : Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field; Thy arts of building from the bee receive ; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Page 406 - The heart is hard in nature, and unfit For human fellowship, as being void Of sympathy, and therefore dead alike To love and friendship both, that is not pleased With sight of animals enjoying life, Nor feels their happiness augment his own.
Page 320 - ... wisdom is a fox, who, after long hunting, will at last cost you the pains to dig out. It is a cheese, which, by how much the richer, has the thicker, the homelier, and the coarser coat; and whereof, to a judicious palate, the maggots are the best.
Page 414 - Form'd on the Samian school, or those of Ind, There are who think these pastimes scarce humane : Yet in my mind (and not relentless I) His life is pure that wears no fouler stains.
Page 41 - To be no more. Sad cure! for who would lose, Though full of pain, this intellectual being, Those thoughts that wander through eternity, To perish rather, swallowed up and lost In the wide womb of uncreated Night, Devoid of sense and motion?
Page 322 - Thus when a poet tells us, the bosom of his mistress is as white as snow, there is no wit in the comparison ; but when he adds, with a sigh, that it is as cold too, it then grows into wit.
Page 320 - Wisdom is a hen whose cackling we must value and consider, because it is attended with an egg. But then, lastly, it is a nut, which, unless you choose with judgment, may cost you a tooth, and pay you with nothing but a worm.

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