Three Essays

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Oxford University Press, 1975 - Liberty. - 550 pages
2 Reviews
The three major essays collected in this volume were written in the latter half of Mill's life (1806-1873) and were quickly accepted into the canon of European political and social thought. Today, when liberty and representative government collide with other principles and when women still experience prejudice, Mill's essays reveal his sense of history, intelligence, and ardent concern for human liberty, and continue to shed light on politics and contemporary society.

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Review: Three Essays: On Liberty, Representative Government, and the Subjection of Women

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

I had to read The Subjection of Women for school. I was really surprised how much I liked it, and again at how readable he is. Read full review

Review: Three Essays: On Liberty, Representative Government, and the Subjection of Women

User Review  - Paul - Goodreads

"That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfereing with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the ... Read full review

Contents

CHAP
5
OF INDIVIDUALITY AS ONE OF THE ELEMENTS
69
OF THE LIMITS TO THE AUTHORITY OF SOCIETY
92
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

John Stuart Mill, Classical economist, was born in 1806. His father was the Ricardian economist, James Mill. John Stuart Mill's writings on economics and philosophy were prodigious. His "Principles of Political Economy, With Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy," published in 1848, was the leading economics textbook of the English-speaking world during the second half of the 19th century. Some of Mill's other works include "Considerations on Representative Government," "Auguste Comte and Positivism," "The Subjection of Women," and "Three Essays on Religion." John Mill died in 1873.

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