Tracts and Other Papers Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America: From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Peter Force
P. Force, 1846 - United States
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Page 27 - Then Samuel took a stone, and set it between Mizpeh and Shen, and called the name of it Eben-ezer, saying, Hitherto hath the Lord helped us.
Page 9 - And I saw three unclean spirits like frogs come out of the mouth of the dragon, and out of the mouth of the beast, and out of the mouth of the false prophet.
Page 36 - The civil magistrate may not assume to himself the administration of the Word and Sacraments, or the power of the keys of the kingdom of heaven: yet he hath authority, and it is his duty to take order, that unity and peace be preserved in the Church, that the truth of God be kept pure and entire, that all blasphemies and heresies be suppressed, all corruptions and abuses in worship and discipline prevented or reformed, and all the ordinances of God duly settled, administered, and observed.
Page 50 - An Act for exempting their Majesties protestant subjects dissenting " from the Church of England from the penalties of certain laws...
Page 19 - Given under my hand and seal, this day of , in the year of our Lord , at , in the [county] aforesaid.
Page 17 - Anne, by the grace of God, queen of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland. Defender of the Faith...
Page vi - An Account of the late Revolution in New England, together with the declaration of the Gentlemen, merchants and inhabitants of Boston and the country adjacent, April 18, 1689.
Page 37 - Infidelity, or difference in religion, doth not make void the magistrate's just and legal authority, nor free the people from their due obedience to him...
Page 16 - Judge, to close up the debate and trial, trims up a speech that pleased himself (we suppose) more than the people. Among many other remarkable Passages, to this purpose, he bespeaks the Jury's obedience, who (we suppose) were very well preinclined, viz. I am glad...
Page 30 - ... not to be repugnant but as near as may be agreeable to the laws and statutes of this our kingdom of Great Britain...

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