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An interesting story line, coupled with absolutely brilliant use of language in the description of events, a air of mystery and happening constantly surrounds that characters in the novel, making 'A Christmas Carol' an utterly engaging read which is definitely worth your time! A brilliant all-time classic that is definitely not to be missed! 

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Hundreds of details that the movies and short films are only a pretext of the information written. The details of the mere volume of thoughts that Scrooge and several characters felt that i have never seen in any film, with the quality creative writing style makes this a beautiful Christmas tradition for reading to the family or listening with the family while a professional orator reads the brilliance of the moods.
What a great memory this makes for moral structure and Christmas closeness if made a serious part of any family's tradition.
The video's and films do NOT express many of the details of the authors intent on what brings quality of life not the volume of experiences of each ghost that films portray that only an hour was spent with each ghost yet the experiences with each ghost was extensive and deep lessons of what qualities Scrooge was missing needed serious time and process for him to not JUST feel guilty and repent, but to notice what life is truly about. (With details not in any film, considered unimportant I suppose.)
Along with "Mankind should have been my business." Dickens pushes us all in a way that most authors today are not allow to make such boasts unless they sell Christian books to just a few (1%) of the masses that need moral purging.
Dickens shows serious consequence that Proverbs of the Old Testament also shares with mankind.
This is a rich book. The Ghost of Dickens Past, also, is rich with weirdness and moral decision that make us responsible to God, mankind, and ourselves.
Who writes to help us to become the best we can be anymore? Scrooge sees his old partner go out the window and as Scrooge looks he sees several amazing things that no movie has ever even talked about, Governments Chained together, other chained prisoners of selfishness and cruelty to themselves.
This is an insightful and beautiful book that if read well, will change the heart and future of anyone who is honest with themselves.
Many will red this book and never see it's importance. Others, a few, will see the great worth of it's pages and aspire to create more material that does the same. That changes mankind.
For He is our business.
God Bless have a wonderful Christmas, thinking the right things.
God Bless us, Everyone.
 

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A christmas carol
Thos book is the perfect family book to read on new years eve perfect for both adults and children

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A christmas carol
I like mr scrooge he doesn't give that much money

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A christmas carol
I just liked this book as much that i had to read it twice.

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A christmas carol
Fabulous read enjoyed it far more than the films Would highly recommend

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Okay
I found it a bit boring B-)

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Good book
I'm glad that such a masterpiece is available free.

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a chrismas carol
sweet but we have never read it .

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I've seen about 6 film versions of A Christmas Carol, including one from the 1930's, one from the 1950's, one musical, one CGI film, and one version with Muppets, but I've never actually read A Christmas Carol until now. I'm so glad I did! It's familiar and moving, true, but it's also hilarious, which is something that rarely comes across in the movies. In the famous opening line, “Marley was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that,” the narrator follows up his statement with plenty of proofs about just how dead Marley is, and he continues to makes asides and comments to the reader throughout the book. The narrator is his own character, really, with opinions, tastes, and preferences, and he is very aware that he's narrating and keeps referring to himself in the first person. After some thought, I've decided that A Muppet Christmas Carol with its inclusion of Gonzo as a narrator comes the closest to hitting on the high pitch of descriptive comedy actually contained in the book.
Beyond the funniness, the sorrow in the book is also very palpable, and I'm particularly struck by Jacob Marley's suffering as it's portrayed in the book. There's an extra impact to the lines when they're read:
Scrooge: “What do you want with me?”
Marley: “Much.”
and later, “Speak comfort to me, Jacob!”
-“I have none to give.
Even with all of Marley's evident pain, Scrooge humbugs everything and it's extraordinary how much supernatural interference it takes to make him believe in anything but his own small power. Scrooge does eventually get accustomed to the weirdness, though, and the narrator says that as he waits for ghost number 2, he's expecting the sudden appearance of anything from a baby to a rhinoceros. I was eager to see the book's depiction of the Spirit of Christmas Past because this is the character that has been presented with the most variety in the film versions. I've seen the ghost presented as an old man, an old woman, a little girl, and a living flame. In the book, it's a child who also looks like an old man and a living flame—which clears up my mental image perfectly. (No, no it doesn't.)
I also love some of the details we get about Scrooge's past in the book. For example, Scrooge used to adore (and still gets very excited about) adventure stories like Robinson Crusoe and Abi Baba and the Forty Thieves. And book-Fezziwig is even fezziwig-ier than I've seen in movies, and he's prone to exclamations like “Yo-ho, hilli-ho, chirrup!” But he's not a silly figure for all this exclaiming; his heart is so generous that he brings joy to everyone around him, including people who are unpopular and mistreated.
I find it interesting is that this book with its odd phantoms and strange philosophy still manages to keep the “Christ” in Christmas. Most film versions take out any reference to Jesus' birth or even to God beyond Tiny Tim's “God bless us, every one!” But here, the child born in Bethlehem is mentioned fairly regularly as being a key part behind why we should love our neighbors.
A Christmas Carol is a pleasure to read. It perfectly portrays the contrast between the abundant plenty of Christmas feasts among those with wherewithal, and the the cold, pinched deprivation of people who are outside. The point of the story is that Scrooge must become the kind of person who brings all that warm, hearty merriness from the inner circle and carries it to those who are in need. He does so beautifully and admirably. May that truly be said of us, and all of us. Five Star's. (*****)
 

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