Managing the Monstrous Feminine: Regulating the Reproductive Body

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Routledge, 2006 - Psychology - 219 pages
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Managing the Monstrous Feminine takes a unique approach to the study of the material and discursive practices associated with the construction and regulation of the female body. Jane Ussher examines the ways in which medicine, science, the law and popular culture combine to produce fictions about femininity, positioning the reproductive body as the source of women's power, danger and weakness.
Including sections on 'regulation', 'the subjectification of women' and 'women's negotiation and resistance', this book describes the construction of the 'monstrous feminine' in mythology, art, literature and film, revealing its implications for the regulation and experience of the fecund female body. Critical reviews are combined with case studies and extensive interview material to illuminate discussions of subjects including:

  • the regulation of women through the body
  • regimes of knowledge associated with reproduction
  • intersubjectivity and the body
  • women's narratives of resistance.

These insights into the relation between the construction of the female body and women's subjectivity will be of interest to those studying health psychology, social psychology, medical sociology, gender studies and cultural studies. The book will also appeal to all those looking for a high-level introduction to contemporary feminist thought on the female body.

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About the author (2006)

Jane M Ussher is Professor of Women's Health Psychology, and director of the Gender Culture and Health Research Unit: PsyHealth, at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. She is author and editor of a number of books, including The Psychology of the Female Body and Body Talk: Material and Discursive Regulation of Sexuality, Madness and Reproduction. Her current research focuses on women's sexual and reproductive health, with particular emphasis on premenstrual experiences, and gendered issues in caring.

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