Vathek, by W. Beckford. [Tr. by S. Henley. Followed by] The castle of Otranto, by H. Walpole [and] The bravo of Venice, tr. from the Germ. [of J.H.D. Zschokke] by M.G. Lewis (Google eBook)

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Page 117 - PER me si va nella cittą dolente, Per me si va nell' eterno dolore, Per me si va tra la perduta gente. Giustizia mosse il mio alto fattore : Fecemi la divina potestate, La somma sapienza e il primo amore. Dinanzi a me non fur cose create, Se non eterne, ed io eterno duro : Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch...
Page 125 - Not equal, as their sex not equal seem'd: For contemplation he and valour form'd; For softness she, and sweet attractive grace; He for God only, she for God in him; His fair large front and eye sublime declar'd Absolute rule; and hyacinthine locks Round from his parted forelock manly hung Clust'ring, but not beneath his shoulders broad...
Page 145 - It was an attempt to blend the two kinds of romance, the ancient and the modern. In the former, all was imagination and improbability: in the latter, nature is always intended to be, and sometimes has been, copied with success.
Page 113 - Surely men of low degree are vanity, and men of high degree are a lie : to be laid in the balance, they are altogether lighter than vanity.
Page 109 - I'll read you matter deep and dangerous ; As full of peril and adventurous spirit, As to o'er-walk a current, roaring loud, On the unsteadfast footing of a spear.
Page 121 - For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell, Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 129 - Romanorum," the author of the Mysterious Mother, a tragedy of the highest order, and not a puling love-play. He is the father of the first romance, and of the last tragedy in our language, and surely worthy of a higher place than any living writer, be he who he may.
Page 112 - Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!
Page 128 - It is the fashion to underrate Horace Walpole ; firstly, because he was a nobleman, and secondly, because he was a gentleman ; but, to say nothing of the composition of his incomparable letters, and of the " Castle of Otranto," he is the " Ultimus Romanorum," the author of the " Mysterious Mother," a tragedy of the highest order, and not a puling love-play.
Page 146 - Desirous of leaving the powers of fancy at liberty to expatiate through the boundless realms of invention, and thence of creating more interesting situations, he wished to conduct the mortal agents in his drama according to the rules of probability...

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