A Descriptive Catalogue of the Fictile Ivories in the South Kensington Museum (Google eBook)

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G. E. Eyre and W. Spottiswoode, printer to the Queen, 1876 - 547 pages
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Page 144 - Matthew, the lion of St. Mark, the bull of St. Luke and the eagle of St. John.
Page 248 - Daniel had convicted them of false witness by their own mouth: and according to the law of Moses they did unto them in such sort as they maliciously intended to do to their neighbour: and they put them to death.
Page 39 - Elle se retourne avec effroi vers un ange ailé qui est derrière elle et semble lui parler.
Page 8 - ... rocks and under the cedar trees; it was where I used to play before I got big enough to go to the river with the niggers to swim. My grandfather rode across the lot and over the rise back of the house. He sat up pretty straight for an old man, holding the bridle in his left hand, and in his right hand a long hickory tobacco stick whittled down to make a walking cane. I walked behind him, and watched the big straw hat he wore waggle a little above his narrow neck, or how he held the stick in the...
Page 20 - ... are represented in a very superior manner, a bear, lion, and tiger being attacked by (or rather attacking) the combatants, who endeavour to protect themselves by throwing the lasso, and large barred gates, or roundabouts, are so contrived that a man could escape by getting into one of the divisions. In the upper part of the circus one of the combatants is riding off on horseback, whilst two others are peeping in at side doors. On the second leaf two victorious racehorses are led before the Consul...
Page 301 - Amour. The fortress has been carried, and the knights pass over a bridge ; one having a lady seated before him, another stands on his saddle to lift a damsel from the window of the castle, whilst two other females gaze on the group from the windows of a round tower. The knights are in chain-armour with sleeveless surcoats, some having the simple coif de mailles, whilst others wear the close bascinet. Three of them have heater-shields ; and it may be remarked that the knight standing on his saddle...
Page 3 - JEsculapius (accompanied by Telesphorus) rests upon his club, round which a serpent is twined. On the second leaf Hygeia (with Cupid at her feet) leans upon a tripod, holding a serpent with her left hand whilst she feeds it with her right. 46*. The small piece of ^Esculapius and Hygeia in a private collection in Switzerland, of which Dr. Keller has kindly furnished a cast. This is in much deeper relief than the preceding, and full of energy in the design. Here _32sculapius...
Page 13 - ... British Museum. 4**. The Royal Library of Berlin possesses a perfect diptych of great beauty of the Consul Rufius Probianus, formerly in the Paulinisch Library at Munster, now forming the cover of a MS. Life of St. Ludgerus, of which the lecturer believed that no figure had hitherto been published '. Each leaf is divided into two compartments, in the upper of which the Consul is represented seated on a cushion, in front of a tetrastyle building with Corinthian capitals, and curtains suspended...
Page 20 - On the lower part of the first leaf the combats of the circus are represented in a very superior manner, a bear, lion, and tiger being attacked by (or rather attacking) the combatants, who endeavour to protect themselves by throwing the lasso, and large barred gates, or roundabouts, are so contrived that a man could escape by getting into one of the divisions. In the upper part of the circus one of the combatants is riding off on horseback, whilst two others are peeping in at side doors. On the second...
Page xx - The workmanfhip is peculiar, only the outlines of the figure and drapery being carved into the ivory, and...

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