Klee Wyck (Google eBook)

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D & M Publishers, Dec 1, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 144 pages
14 Reviews
The title of artist, writer, and rebel Emily Carr's first book means "Laughing One," the nickname given her by the Native people of Canada's west coast. She returned the favor with Klee Wyck, a collection of 21 "word portraits" of their lives and ways. The memoir describes in witty, vivid detail Carr's visits and travels as she painted their totem poles and villages and got to know a people whose "quiet strength healed my heart." The book is reissued here with restored text and features the original introduction by Ira Dilworth and a new introduction by Carr scholar Kathryn Bridge.
  

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Review: Klee Wyck

User Review  - Lotus - Goodreads

Loved this book, I love Emily and visit often her grave and the home of her youth. Unfortunately the home she lived in as an adult "The House Of All Sorts" is currently rented into suites. I am so ... Read full review

Review: Klee Wyck

User Review  - Susan Eubank - Goodreads

"There was no soil to be seen. Above the beach it was all luxuriant growth; the earth was so full of vitality that every seed which blew across her surface germinated and burst. The growing things ... Read full review

Contents

VI
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VIII
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XII
XIII
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XXI
XXII
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Copyright

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Page 14 - ... the right to claim authorship of the work, as well as the right to restrain any distortion, mutilation or other modification of the work that would be prejudicial to his honour or reputation.

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About the author (2009)

"Young, spirited and rebellious, Emily Carr escaped a strict Victorian household to study art in the Paris of Picasso and Matisse. In middle age, she shook the dust of acceptable society from her shoes and began a passionate journey into the wilderness of British Columbia; the power of her genius made her one of the twentieth century's great painters. Fortunately, she also wrote. In her books, her warmth, her humanity, her sense of fun and the ridiculous combine to present a self-portrait of a remarkable woman and artist."–Mary Pratt

Kathryn Bridge is an archivist and manager of the British Columbia Archives. In 2001 she was curatorial chair for the exhibit Emily Carr: Eccentric, Artist, Author, Genius. She has written three books about women in Canadian history: Henry & Self: The Private Life of Sarah Lindley Crease, By Snowshoe, Buckboard and Steamer: Women of the Frontier (Winner of the 1998 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal for Historical Writing) and Phyllis Munday: Mountaineer.

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