Francisci BAconi de Verulamio, ...: Novum organum, sive Indicia vera de interpretatione naturæ (Google eBook)

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E Typographeo academico, 1855 - 385 pages
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Page 14 - There are and can be only two ways of searching into and discovering truth. The one flies from the senses and particulars to the most general axioms, and from these principles, the truth of which it takes for settled and immovable, proceeds to judgment and to the discovery of middle axioms.
Page 182 - Again ; the mathematical postulate, that " things which are equal to the same are equal to one another," is similar to the form of the syllogism in logic, which unites things agreeing in the middle term.
Page 25 - ... is in like manner unobserved. And yet unless these two things just mentioned be searched out and brought to light, nothing great can be achieved in nature, as far as the production of works is concerned. So again the essential nature of our common air, and of all bodies less dense than air (which are very many), is almost unknown.
Page 341 - Part I. On the rights and Duties of Nations in time of Peace. New Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 8vo, 15*.
Page 111 - ... one another; and nevertheless the very beholding of the light is itself a more excellent and a fairer thing than all the uses of it;— so assuredly the very contemplation of things, as they are, without superstition or imposture, error or confusion, is in itself more worthy than all the fruit of inventions.
Page 342 - Fasti Romani. The Civil and Literary Chronology of Rome and Constantinople, from the Death of Augustus to the Death of Heraclius.
Page 110 - Now, the empire of man over things is founded on the arts and sciences alone, for nature is only to be commanded by obeying her.
Page 109 - It is the glory of God to conceal a thing : but the honour of kings is to search out a matter.
Page 68 - : noted accurately, tend wholly to the unfair circumscription of human power, and to a deliberate and factitious despair ; which not only disturbs the auguries of hope, but also cuts the sinews and spur of industry, and throws away the chances of experience itself...
Page 34 - Homoeomera of Anaxagoras; the Atoms of Leucippus and Democritus; the Heaven and Earth...

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