The Queens of England: A Series of Portraits of Distinguished Female Sovereigns (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton & Company, 1854
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Page 10 - And bade to form her infant mind. Stern, rugged Nurse ! thy rigid lore With patience many a year she bore ; What sorrow was, thou bad'st her know, And from her own she learn'd to melt at others
Page 273 - Christ was the word that spake it, He took the bread and brake it, And what that word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Page 275 - ... were the four evangelists and the apostle St. Paul, who had been long shut up in an unknown tongue, as it were in prison ; so as they could not converse with the common people. The queen answered very gravely, that it was best first to inquire of them, whether they would be released or no.
Page 207 - Alas ! my lords," answered the queen,2 "is it now a question whether I be the king's lawful wife or no, when I have been married to him almost twenty years and no objection made before ? Divers prelates and lords, privy councillors of the king, are yet alive who then adjudged our marriage good and lawful ; and now to say it is detestable is a great marvel to me ; especially when I consider what a wise prince the king's father was, and also the natural love and affection my father, king Ferdinand,...
Page 316 - Compton's designation, and not its evaporation, being known, could not make her way between the scornful backs and elbows of her late devotees, nor could approach nearer to the Queen than the third or fourth row ; but no sooner was she descried by her Majesty than the Queen said aloud, " There, I am sure, I see a friend !" The torrent divided and shrunk to either side ; " and as I came away," said my mother, " I might have walked over their heads if I had pleased.
Page 275 - Basilides, his son Theodore revoked the patent which the English enjoyed for a monopoly of the Russian trade : When the queen remonstrated against this innovation, he told her ministers that princes must carry an indifferent hand, as well between their subjects as between foreigners; and not convert trade, which by the laws of nations ought to be common to all, into a monopoly for the private gain of a few.
Page 84 - The king soon after, by the advice of his council, ordered his mother to be confined in a goodly castle, and gave her plenty of ladies to wait upon her, as well as knights and squires of honour.
Page 214 - Bapin. of virtuous instruction, they gave her teachers in playing on musical instruments, singing and dancing, insomuch that when she composed her hands to play and her voice to sing, it was joined with that sweetness of countenance that three harmonies concurred ; likewise when she danced, her rare proportions varied themselves into all the graces that belong either to rest or motion- Briefly, it seems that the most attractive perfections were eminent in her.
Page 280 - ... dainty tablet, the Queen espying it asked what fine jewel that was. The Lady Derby was curious to excuse the shewing of it ; but the Queen would have it, and opening it and finding it to be Mr Secretary's, snatched it away, and tied it upon her shoe, and walked long with it there; then she took it thence, and pinned it on her elbow, and wore it some time there also, which Mr.
Page 280 - Our queen is troubled with a rheum in her arm, which vexeth her very much, besides the grief she hath conceived for my lord of Essex's death. She sleepeth. not so much by day as she used, neither taketh rest by night. Her delight is to sit in the dark, and sometimes with shedding tears, to bewail Essex.

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