Mrs. Warren's Profession (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Oct 1, 2006 - Drama - 60 pages
29 Reviews
Middle-aged Mrs. Warren is a madam, proprietress of a string of successful brothels. Her daughter, Vivie, is a modern young woman, but not so modern that she's not shocked to discover the source of her mother's wealth. The clash of these two strong-willed but culturally constrained Victorian women is the spark that ignites the ironic wit of one of George Bernard Shaw's greatest plays, a withering critique of male domination, sexual hypocrisy, and societal convention. Initially banned after its 1893 publication with its startling frankness, Mrs. Warren's Profession remains a powerful work of progressive theater. Irish playwright GEORGE BERNARD SHAW (1856-1950) won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1925 and an Academy Award for Adapted Screenplay in 1938, the only person to achieve both honors. Among his many renowned plays are Arms and the Man (1894), Candida (1894), Man and Superman (1903), Major Barbara (1905), and Pygmalion (1913).
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
7
4 stars
13
3 stars
7
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: Mrs. Warren's Profession

User Review  - Audrey - Goodreads

One of the things that stuck out to me in this was the way that Shaw was willing to examine the complexities of difficult social issues. This play discusses the fact that there is often a reason for ... Read full review

Review: Mrs. Warren's Profession

User Review  - Bruce - Goodreads

Any play by George Bernard Shaw deserves a careful reading of his extended introduction, his introductions always clarifying his intent and motivation in writing the particular play he is presenting ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
44
Section 3
57
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2006)

Renowned literary genius George Bernard Shaw was born on July 26, 1856 in Dublin, Ireland. He later moved to London and educated himself at the British Museum while several of his novels were published in small socialist magazines. Shaw later became a music critic for the Star and for the World. He was a drama critic for the Saturday Review and later began to have some of his early plays produced. Shaw wrote the plays Man and Superman, Major Barbara, and Pygmalion, which was later adapted as My Fair Lady in both the musical and film form. He also transformed his works into screenplays for Saint Joan, How He Lied to Her Husband, Arms and the Man, Pygmalion, and Major Barbara. Shaw won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925. George Bernard Shaw died on November 2, 1950 at Ayot St. Lawrence, Hertfordshire, England.

Bibliographic information