A treasury of old favourite tales, introduced in the story of Rockbourne hall, ed. and written by M. Howitt (Google eBook)

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Mary Howitt
1860
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Page 209 - ... for the tree was covered with the richest fruit, the like I had never tasted before. Who knows but some passionate holy sportsman, or sporting abbot or bishop, may have shot, planted and fixed the cross between the antlers of St. Hubert's stag, in a manner similar to this?
Page 209 - Przobossky's noble country-seat in Lithuania, and remained with the ladies at tea in the drawing-room, while the gentlemen were down in the yard, to see a young horse of blood,- which had just arrived from the stud We suddenly heard a noise of distress ; I hastened down-stairs, and found the horse so unruly, that nobody durst approach or mount him.
Page 210 - I thought it would be prudent to stop in the market-place to order the men to rendezvous. I stopped, gentlemen, but judge of my astonishment when in this market-place I saw not one of my hussars about me Are they scouring the other streets, or what is become of them? They could not be far off, and must, at all events, soon join me. In...
Page 111 - Riot stood silent for some time, and then begged to be allowed to consult with his friends what was best for him to do. This was agreed to, and he was permitted to retire, though under guard of an officer. After a short absence, he returned with more humility in his looks, and said that he pleaded guilty, and threw himself on the mercy of the Court. The Judge then made a speech of some length, for the purpose of convincing the prisoner, as well as the bystanders, of the enormity of the crime. He...
Page 200 - Rucar*), now in my. custody and most valuable. My aunt played and sung well, and had a great deal of life and humour, but no turn to business ; though my mother had the same qualifications, and liked it as well as she did, she was forced to drudge ; and many jokes used to pass betwixt the sisters about their different occupations...
Page 206 - ... some years), he bore the violent heat of the sun much better than I could; in our excursion he had made a considerable progress through a thick wood when I was only at the entrance. Near the banks of a large piece of water, which had engaged my attention, I thought I heard a rustling noise behind ; on turning about, I was almost petrified (as who would not...
Page 207 - I then with the butt-end of my fowling-piece rammed the head farther into the throat of the crocodile, and destroyed him by suffocation, for he could neither gorge nor eject it. Soon after I had thus gained a complete victory over my two powerful adversaries, my companion arrived in search of me ; for finding...
Page 195 - Square, where he had promised to meet him in less than half an hour. But more than two hours had elapsed ; and Sandy Wright, fatigued and melancholy, was sauntering slowly along the street, musing on his altered circumstances, when a gentleman, who had passed him with the quick hurried step of a person engaged in business, stopped abruptly a few yards away, and returning at a much slower pace, eyed him steadfastly as he repassed. He again came forward and stood. " Are you not Mr. Wright ?" he enquired....
Page 33 - ... on the earth while a wren soars above him !' Dicky was now ashamed of himself, and inspired with emulation ; therefore, without delay, he spread his wings and his tail ; his father with pleasure placed himself in a proper attitude before him, then rising from the ground, led the way ; and Dicky, by carefully following his example, safely arrived at the nest, which he found a most comfortable resting-place after the fatigue of the morning, and rejoiced that he had a good father to teach him what...
Page 224 - I will tell you a story, my Harry. On the other side of yonder hill there runs a mighty clear river, and in that river, on a time, there lived three silver trouts the prettiest little fishes that any one ever saw. Now, God took a great liking and love to these pretty silver trouts, and he let them want for nothing that such little fishes could have occasion for ; but two of them grew sad and discontented, and the one wished for this thing, and the other wished for that thing, and neither of them...

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