Roman Britain and the English Settlements

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Biblo & Tannen Publishers, Feb 1, 1936 - History - 515 pages
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Contents

BRITAIN BEFORE THE ROMAN CONQUEST
1
BRITAIN IN THE TIME OF JULIUS CAESAR
16
Distribution of the population
17
CAESARS INVASION
32
The invasion of 54
41
FROM CAESAR TO CLAUDIUS
54
Roman intentions with relation to Britain
71
The invasion
79
Contrast between artistic and religious conditions in Roman Britain
261
Lack of unity in RomanoBritish paganism
269
THE END OF ROMAN BRITAIN
274
The House of Valentinian
284
THE END OF ROMAN RULE
291
Extent and character of the reoccupation
299
British affairs from 400 to 450
306
Condition of Britain about 450
313

Verulam becomes a municipium
86
Caratacus betrayed to Ostorius by Cartirnandua 95
95
The later years of Nero
105
Julius Agricola
113
THE MAKING OF THE FRONTIER
120
It is not the Trajanic frontier
126
The building of the Wall
136
Motives for the creation of the Antonine Wall
146
The civil wars of 193197
155
BRITAIN UNDER ROMAN RULE
161
The capital of Roman Britain
170
Density of the population
180
THE TOWNS
186
RomanoBritish townlife at its apogee
196
Agriculture in Roman Britain
208
The villa system
213
The villages
221
CONTENTS
226
Communications
240
XV
247
Impossibility of fusing these two traditions
254
ANGLES SAXONS
325
A geographical approach essential
333
Angles Saxons and Jutes in Britain
347
The literary tradition of the settlement of Kent
357
Composite character of Kentish culture
363
Settlement of Surrey
369
The common features in the settlement of the southeast
377
Importance of the fcnlands in the AngloSaxon settlement
383
Extent of settlement based on the fenlands
388
AngloSaxon penetration of the Midlands
408
its geographical isolation
414
Bcrnicia settled late and from the sea
421
The problem of urban continuity
428
The problem of the countryside
440
Summary survey of the state of England soon after the middle of
451
APPENDIXES TO BOOK V
457
BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR BOOKS IIV
462
BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR BOOK V
478
INDEX
491
Copyright

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About the author (1936)

Robin George Collingwood was a remarkable thinker who sought to bridge the gulf that Charles Darwin's discoveries appeared to have set up between science and religion in the nineteenth century. He began to study Latin at age 4, Greek at 6, and the natural sciences shortly afterward. He attended Oxford University, where he studied philosophy, classics, archeology, and history: Participation in numerous archeological excavations allowed him to see, he said, "the importance of the questioning activity in life," and he became a respected scholar on the subject of Britain under the Roman conquest. His first-rate work in archeology resulted in a number of books including Roman Britain (1921), The Archaeology of Roman Britain (1930, with Ian Richmond), Roman Britain and the English Settlements (1937, with J.N. Myres), and Roman Inscriptions of Britain (1965, with R. P. Wright). Collingwood was also an artist by nature - a fine, disciplined writer who was actively interested in music and the pictorial arts. He deplored the diversiveness of increasing specialization and sought a philosophy that would harmonize all knowledge and a religion "scientific" in nature in which faith and reason each played a role. He felt that the Renaissance had mistakenly separated the various disciplines of study and that a close unity existed among them. He began as an idealist, and his thought reflects the influence of individual idealists, in the case of art, for example, the influence of Benedetto Croce. In his mature period, Collingwood sought to ground all the special sciences on idealist foundations, to ascertain within the dialectical function of mind the unity of religion, science, history, art, and philosophy. In his last years, however, Collingwood became critical of idealism. His ethical and political views grew somber, and pessimism seemed to overwhelm him.

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