Zen Enlightenment: Origins and Meaning

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Shambhala Publications, 2007 - Religion - 175 pages
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Enlightenment, the cosmic experience of universal unity, is a notoriously elusive concept in Zen. Here, the renowned scholar Heinrich Dumoulin traces the development of Zen and the concept of enlightenment from its origins in India through its development in China to its fruition in Japan. Delineating the Buddhist origins, as well as the Taoist and yogic influences, he traces the historical path Zen has followed, with special emphasis given to the development of koan practice and the writings of the great Japanese Zen master Dogen (12001253). He then brings the experience to life by presenting, in his own words, the enlightenment experiences of a number of contemporary practitioners of Zen.
  

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Contents

The Western View of Zen
3
Indian Roots
14
The Birth of Zen in China
25
Bodhidharma
35
The Sixth Patriarch
42
The Zen Movement in China
53
The Koan in Chinese Zen
65
Zen Buddhism in Japan
77
Dogen The Master of Zazen
88
The Doc
102
The Zen Experience in Contemporary
125
Zen Enlightenment
139
The Ten Oxherding Pictures
154
Bibliography
165
Index
171
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About the author (2007)

Heinrich Dumoulin (19051995) was one of the world's leading scholars of Zen and the author of several books on Zen and Buddhism, including A History of Zen Buddhism, Buddhism in the Modern World, and Christianity Meets Buddhism. He was for many years Professor of Philosophy and History of Religions at Sophia University in Japan.

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