The Life of William Shakespeare: Including Many Particulars Respecting the Poet and His Family Never Before Published (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. R. Smith, 1848 - Dramatists, English - 336 pages
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Contents

Mark and seal of Agnes Arden
11
Will of Agnes Arden
12
8 Inventory of the goods of Agnes Arden
13
Will and Inventory of Robert Arden
15
Signatures of the bailiff and aldermen of Stratford 1565
18
Signatures and marks from a roll of eourtleet
19
Passage in whieh John Shakespeare is mentioned as a glover
21
10 Orders made at Stratford Oet 8th 1553
24
Mark of Margery Lorde 1609
29
Autograph of Gilbert one of Shakespeares brothers ib 13 Payment for the bell and pall for Anne Shakespeare 1579
30
Shakespeares birthplaee from an old drawing in the British Museum
33
Fine relating to houses in Henley street 1575
34
Plan of the Shakespeare property in Henleystreet
35
13 Abstraet of title of the Swan Inn
36
Mark of John Shakespeare 15967
37
Autograph of Thomas Quiney Shakespeares soninlaw
38
Shakespeares birthplaee September 1847
39
Direetion of letter addressed to Shakespeare
40
Carved basrelief formerly at the Boars Head tavern
41
Pennytoken of the Boars Head tavern
42
Autograph of Riehard Burbage
43
Autograph of John Heminges
44
16 Plea relating to an aetion against John Shakespeare
46
House sold by Geteley to Shakespeare 1602
47
The marketeross Stratford now pulled down
48
Signature of Sir William Davenant
49
Signature of William Walker Shakespeares godson
50
Stratford College the residenee of John Combe
51
Parsons Close alias Shakespeares Close
52
21 Fine relating to the mortage of Ashbies
53
Interior of the Hall of Stratford College 1785
54
John Robinsons house in the Blaekfriars
55
Marks of the parents of Shakespeare
57
Marks and seals of the same
58
The seeond signature to the will
59
The third signature to the will
60
Autographs of the witnesses to the will
61
Autograph of Gilbert Shakespeare
62
Writing supposed to be in the autograph of Shakespeare
63
Inseription on Shakespeares tomb
64
Marks of the affeerors 1561 ineluding that of John Shakespeare
65
Lines under the monument to Shakespeare
66
Inseription on the grave of Shakespeares wife
67
Autograph and Seal of Susanna Hall
68
Mark of Judith Shakespeare
69
Signatures of Eliza George and Thomas Nash
70
Autograph of Dr John Hall
71
Autograph of Thomas Quiney
72
Seal and Autograph of Elizabeth Barnard
73
The same of Sir John Barnard
74
Shakespeares sealring
75
Autograph and seal of Julius Shaw
76
Original sketeh of Shakespeares arms 1599
79
37 List of tenants in Bridgestreet Ward
82
Signature of Bartholomew Hathaway
115
Anne Hathaways eottage as it appeared in 1825
116
41 Deelarations against John Shakespeare 1566
117
42 Inventory of the goods of John Riehardsons 1594
118
Seal and autograph of Sir Thomas Luey
124
Signature of Sir Thomas Luey
125
43 Extraets from the reeords of Stratford
127
House in Highstreet Stratford dated 1596
134
Certifieate to the Privy Couneil 1589
137
Letter of Dr James to Sir Henry Bourehier
154
46 The eighth sonnet from Brights MS
158
The boundary elm Stratford 1847
159
Petition of the players to the Privy Couneil 1596
162
Inhabitantes of Sowtherk as have eomplaned 1596
164
Plan of New Plaee
165
View of New Plaee about 1740
166
50 Note of eorn and malt at Stratford 15978
167
Letter from Sturley mentioning Shakespeare
172
52 Letter from Riehard Quiny mentioning Shakespeare
175
Letter from Sturley mentioning Shakespeare i6 54 Letter of Riehard Quiny to Shakespeare 1598
178
Subsidy roll of St Helens Bishopsgate
180
56 Grant mentioning the Boars Head Theatre
193
Indenture between Shakespeare and the Combes 1602
198
58 Court Roll relating to a house bought by Shakespeare 1602
201
59 Survey relating to the same house 1606
202
Fine levied on property bought by Shakespeare 1602
203
62 Deelaration of aetion brought by Shakespeare against Phillip Rogers for malt sold and delivered 1604
208
63 Indenture between Huband and Shakespeare 1605
210
64 Bond for performanee of eontraet
216
65 Note respeeting Combe and Shakespeare
217
Letter of H S mentioning Shakespeare
224
Value of shares in the Blaekfriars Theatre
226
Preeepts issued by Shakespeare against Addenbrooke
228
Draft of warrant of Privy Seal 1610
229
70 Fine levied on property purehased bv Shakespeare
231
71 Will of John Combe
234
Papers relating to the house in the Blaekfriars
248
73 Draft of bill respeeting the tithes owned by Shakespeare
258
74 Aneient freeholders in the fields of Old Stratford e
267
75 Copy of the artieles with Mr Shakespeare 1614
268
Shakespeares Will 1616
275
77 Presentments made at Stratford 1605
285
78 WiU of Riehard Hathaway 1582
292
79 Sale of the tithes left by Shakespeare
299
80 Deed of settlement of Shakespeares property 1639
309
81 Another settlement of Shakespeares property 1647
314
82 Settlement of the same property 1652
316
Direetions for the sale of the property 1653
317
Will of Lady Barnard
318
85 Indenture relating to Lady Barnards property
321
86 Extraet from Subsidv Roll mentioning John Shakespeare
327
87 Order relating to the Blaekfriars Theatre
329
Two letters from MSS at Dulwieh College
330
A breif noat taken out of the poores book 1609
331

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 130 - And though this, probably the first essay of his poetry, be lost, yet it is said to have been so very bitter, that it redoubled the prosecution against him to that degree, that he was obliged to leave his business and family in Warwickshire, for some time, and shelter himself in London.
Page 154 - Sweet Swan of Avon ! what a sight it were To see thee in our waters yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James...
Page 185 - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
Page 137 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Page 146 - And thou no less deserving than the other two, in some things rarer, in nothing inferior; driven (as myself) to extreme shifts, a little have I to say to thee: and were it not an idolatrous oath, I would swear by sweet S. George, thou art unworthy better hap, sith * thou dependest on so mean a stay.
Page 163 - There is one instance so singular in the magnificence of this patron of Shakespeare's, that if I had not been assured that the story was handed down by Sir William D'Avenant, who was probably very well acquainted with his affairs, I should not have ventured to have inserted; that my Lord Southampton at one time gave him a thousand pounds, to enable him to go through with a purchase which he heard he had a mind to.
Page 184 - His acquaintance with Ben Jonson began with a remarkable piece of humanity and good nature. Mr. Jonson, who was at that time altogether unknown to the world, had offered one of his plays to the players, in order to have it acted ; and the persons into whose hands it was put, after having turned it...
Page 162 - I know not how I shall offend in dedicating my unpolished lines to your Lordship, nor how the world will censure me for choosing so strong a prop to support so weak a burden. Only, if your Honour seem but pleased, I account myself highly praised; and vow to take advantage of all idle hours, till I have honoured you with some graver labour.
Page 248 - That fox'da beggar so (by chance was found ' Sleeping) that there needed not many a word ' To make him to believe he was a lord: ' But you affirm (and in it seem most eager) * ' Twill make a lord as drunk as any beggar. ' Bid Norton brew such ale as Shakspeare fancies ' Did put Kit Sly into such lordly trances: ' And let us meet there (for a fit of gladness) ' And drink ourselves merry in sober sadness.
Page 189 - Shakespeare was godfather to one of Ben Jonson's children, and, after the christening, being in a deep study, Jonson came to cheer him up, and asked him why he was so melancholy. ' No faith, Ben,' says he, ' not I, but I have been considering a great while what should be the fittest gift for me to bestow upon my godchild, and I have resolved at last.' ' I prythee, what ? ' says he. ' I* faith, Ben, I'll e'en give him a dozen good Latin (latten) spoons, and thou shalt translate them.

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