Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America

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Simon and Schuster, 2005 - History - 400 pages
12 Reviews
"I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves ... are, and henceforward shall be free ..." No other words in American history changed the lives of so many Americans as this declaration from Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Born in the struggle of Lincoln's determination to set slavery on the path to destruction, it has remained a document of struggle. What were Lincoln's real intentions? Prizewinning Lincoln scholar Allen C. Guelzo presents, for the first time, a full scale study of Lincoln's greatest state paper. Using unpublished letters and documents, little-known accounts from Civil War-era newspapers, and Congressional memoirs and correspondence, Guelzo tells the story of the complicated web of statesmen, judges, slaves, and soldiers who accompanied, and obstructed, Abraham Lincoln on the path to the Proclamation. The crisis of a White House at war, of plots in Congress and mutiny in the Army, of one man's will to turn the nation's face toward freedom--all these passionate events come alive in a powerful narrative of Lincoln's, and the Civil War's, greatest moment.
  

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Review: Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America

User Review  - Robin Friedman - Goodreads

Abraham Lincoln issued the final version of the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. Near the end of that year, the artist Francis Carpenter determined to paint "a historical picture of the ... Read full review

Review: Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America

User Review  - Patrick T - Goodreads

Allen C. Guelzo proves yet again, that he is one of the best historian on Lincoln. Great information on The Emancipation Proclamation and his point of views. People always forget that this was not ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
FOUR WAYS TO FREEDOM
13
THE PRESIDENT WILL RISE
76
Three
123
Four
177
Five
229
Postscript
285
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Allen C. Guelzois the Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College, where he also directs the Civil War Era Studies Program and The Gettysburg Semester. He is the author ofAbraham Lincoln: Redeemer President(1999) and Lincoln'sEmancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America(2004), both of which won the Lincoln Prize. He has written essays and reviews forThe Washington Post,The Wall Street Journal,Time, theJournal of American History, and many other publications.

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