Mosby's Men (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Neale Publishing Company, 1907 - United States - 180 pages
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"This book does not purport to be a history of Mosby's command, in the sense of being a full and accurate account of its operations. It is a narrative of what the writer saw of the men and their doings"--Preface.
  

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Contents

I
13
II
36
III
43
IV
56
V
63
VI
76
VII
87
VIII
97
X
116
XI
129
XII
140
XIII
149
XIV
154
XV
163
XVI
173
XVII
177

IX
104

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Page 118 - ... Having learned that a man by the name of Marshall was recruiting a company in the vicinity of Ashby's Gap, and that they were to organize on the 25th, I proceeded to their reported rendezvous, near White Post, and completely surprised them, getting Marshall and four of his men, and capturing all of his papers. In another affair below Front Royal I left eight of his murderers to keep company with some that (were) left by General Custer...
Page 128 - Two of Captain Blazer's men came in this morning Privates Harris and Johnson. They report that Mosby with 300 men attacked Blazer near Kabletown yesterday about u o'clock. They say that the entire command, with the exception of themselves, was captured or killed. I have ordered Major Congdon with 300 Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry to Kabletown to bury dead and take care of wounded, if any, and report all facts he can learn. I shall immediately furnish report as soon as received.
Page 150 - We followed the road to the top of a hill on the edge of the town and saw the streets filled with blue-coated cavalry.
Page 140 - During my absence from my command, the enemy captured six of my men near Front Royal. These were immediately hanged by order and in the presence of General Custer. They also hung another lately in Rappahannock. It is my purpose to hang an equal number of Custer's men whenever I capture them.
Page 140 - I have directed Colonel Mosby, through his adjutant, to hang an equal number of Custer's men in retaliation for those executed by him.
Page 19 - There was another movement with which we were not altogether unfamiliar, an order technically known as the "skedaddle," but I never heard the command given. The Rangers seemed to know instinctively when that movement was appropriate, and never waited for the word...
Page 70 - But they gave us a hearty welcome and we had no reason to suspect that the larder was low. Often have I recalled with gratitude and something of regret the sweetly cooked and daintily served ham and eggs and richly browned cornbread which that day greeted our keen appetites. One of the sons of the family stood watch for us on the neighboring hill, and we ate, and baited our horses and rested in peace.
Page 20 - You see when the Yankees broke they would always run in a bunch, and all we had to do was to follow and pick them up. . . . But when we found it necessary to leave the scene of action, each man worked out his own salvation and 'struck for home and fireside
Page 66 - Here we were, a half-dozen foolish boys, forty miles from our comrades, surrounded on all sides by enemies military and noncombatant and liable at any moment to stir up a hornet's nest. Should our leader and guide fall in a night skirmish, or by any chance become separated from us, the brightest prospect that awaited us would be to ride humbly into the nearest camp, and take our chances as being received and treated as prisoners of war.
Page 63 - About daybreak one morning in the summer of 1864, Bush Underwood aroused me from my slumbers, with an invitation to go with him on a scout about the neighborhood of Georgetown. We had gone into camp near Thoroughfare Gap late the night before, after which I had been on picket for a couple of hours, so I felt very little like...

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