Discoveries: Dada: The Revolt of Art

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Harry N. Abrams, Apr 1, 2006 - Art - 127 pages
2 Reviews
Well-written, loaded with information, and with a rich assortment of illustrations, each "Discoveries"(r) volume is a look at one facet of art, archaeology, music, history, philosophy, popular culture, science, or nature. These innovatively designed, affordably priced, compact paperbacks bring ideas to life and amplify our understanding of civilization in a new way.
Dada was one of the most important and influential movements in 20th-century art. Beginning in the anti-establishment climate around World War I, it encompassed painting, sculpture, photography, poetry and language, graphic design, film, performing arts, and criticism in Europe and America.
Dada had an immense effect on art throughout the 20th century. Its emphasis on machines reflected similar mechanistic currents in art through the war years; its appropriation of advertising imagery was revived in Pop Art in later decades; and its anti-aesthetic, anti-object, and anti-art principles persisted in important spurs of artistic theory and practice through the end of the century.
The movement's history is outlined in this concise, readable text-the only short introduction devoted exclusively to Dada, supplemented with essential documents and a useful bibliography.

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Review: Dada: The Revolt of Art (Discoveries)

User Review  - Carol - Goodreads

A sprightly little introduction to my favorite "ism." Read full review

Review: Dada: The Revolt of Art (Discoveries)

User Review  - Justyna - Goodreads

Pocket sized - image rich - setting out the basics of the movement - i found the layout a bit difficult on the eye at times. Read full review

Contents

Dada is the deliberate subversion of bourgeois values
43
10
50
Chapter 1
92
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Marc Dachy has studied and written about many avant-garde movements over the past thirty years and has published several volumes on Dada. In 2005 he organized the exhibition "Murayama/Schwitters" in Tokyo and published the "Archives du Mouvement Dada". He lives in Paris, France.

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